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Scholarships and prizes

The Australian Linguistic Society offers four Prizes and Scholarships to support linguistics research students: the Gerhardt Laves Scholarship, which covers fieldwork expenses for postgraduate researchers in indigenous languages of Australia or its immediate region; the Susan Kaldor Scholarship, to support ALS student members to attend an international summer school or institute; the Michael Clyne Prize, for the best postgraduate research thesis in immigrant bilingualism and language contact, and the Jalwang Scholarship, which supports linguists to give back to the community by converting some of their research into materials of benefit to the language speakers. The Michael Clyne Prize is awarded jointly with the Applied Linguistics Association of Australia.

The closing date for the current round of applications for Gerhardt Laves and Jalwang Scholarships is Friday 19 August 2016. Applications for the Laves Scholarship must be made using the official application form. The application form and supporting documents must be submitted as email attachments to Bill Palmer (ALS Vice President) at bill.palmer-at-newcastle.edu.au by the closing date. For the Jalwang Scholarship, please follow the instructions below.
 

Past recipients

The past recipients of the Michael Clyne Prize are:

  • 2015: Lucija Medojević from the University of Western Sydney, for her PhD thesis, 'The effect of first year of schooling on bilingual language development: A study of second and third generation Serbian-Australian 5-year-old bilingual children from a processability perspective'
  • 2014: Maria Gindidis from Monash University, for her PhD thesis, 'Australian community language teachers: A phenomenological study'
  • 2013: Amanda Miller Amberber from Macquarie University, for her PhD thesis, 'Language switching, language selection and intervention in bilingual aphasia'
  • 2012: Donna Butorac from the Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University, for her PhD thesis, 'Imagined identity, remembered self: Settlement language learning and the negotiation of gendered subjectivity'
  • 2011: not awarded
  • 2010: Ruth Fielding from the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney, for her PhD thesis 'Speaking two languages: A study exploring how young bilingual students identify with being bilingual'
  • 2009: Emi Otsuji from UTS, whose thesis was titled 'Performing transculturation: Between/within 'Japanese' and 'Australian' language, identities and culture'
  • 2008: Louisa Willoughby from Monash University, for her thesis entitled 'You have to speak it at least'
  • 2007: Brigitte Lambert from the University of Melbourne, for her PhD thesis on German language maintenance in Australia
  • 2006: Jo-anne Hughson from the University of Melbourne, for her PhD thesis on Address in Spanish in an Australian context

The past recipients of the Gerhardt Laves Scholarship are:

  • 2015 (joint): Suzanne Hopf, a PhD Candidate at Charles Sturt University, to support her fieldwork on Fijian children's speech
  • 2015 (joint): Sabrina Meier, a PhD Candidate at the University of Newcastle, to support her fieldwork on the Mono-Alu language of the Solomon Islands
  • 2014: Giordana Santosuosso, a PhD Candidate at Monash University, to support her fieldwork on the Lau language of the Solomon Islands
  • 2013: Brighde Collins, an MA Research Candidate at the University of Melbourne, to undertake field work on Ngandi in the Ngukurr area (NT)
  • 2012: Tim Connell, an MA student at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, to undertake field work on a language referred to locally as Matek, an undescribed language of West Kalimantan, Indonesia, which belongs to the Land Dayak subgroup of Austronesian
  • 2011: Katerina Naitoro, an MA student at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, to undertake field work on 'Are'are, a language spoken in the southern part of the Malaita province in the Solomon Islands
  • 2010: James Collins, Linguistics Honours student at the University of Sydney, to undertake fieldwork on the syntax-morphology interface of Samoan
  • 2009: Dorothea Hoffman of the University of Manchester for work on Jaminjung and Kriol
  • 2008: Jeremy Hammond from the University of Sydney for linguistic and cultural documentation of the Whitesands language of Vanuatu
  • 2007 (joint): Jeremy Hammond from the University of Sydney, for fieldwork on the Whitesands language of Vanuatu
  • 2007 (joint): Laura Dimock from the Victoria University of Wellington, for fieldwork on the Nahavaq language of Vanuatu

Previous Susan Kaldor Scholarship holders are:

  • 2015: Tom Ennever, PhD Candidate at the University of Queensland, to attend the Linguistic Summer Institute at the University of Chicago
  • 2014: Janet Watts, PhD Candidate at Griffith University, to attend the Summer School on Documentary Linguistics and Variationist Sociolinguistics
  • 2013: Kate Horrack, PhD Candidate at the University of Melbourne, to attend the summer school courses at the Linguistic Society of America Institute
  • 2012: Qandeel Hussain, PhD student at Macquarie University, to attend summer school courses at the Linguistic Society of America Institute
  • 2011: not awarded
  • 2010: Sally Dixon, Linguistics PhD student at the University of Sydney, to attend a practicum on Conversation Analysis at Loughborough University, UK, in support of her PhD topic using CA to investigate code-switching in interaction in aboriginal child language
  • 2009: David Penn of UNE, $2,500 to attend the LSA Linguistic Institute
     

For more information on past recipients, please see the following Announcements of Scholarships and Prizes:

ALS Susan Kaldor scholarship

In celebration of the contribution of Susan Kaldor to linguistics in Australia, a scholarship of up to $2,500 is available to ALS student members who wish to attend an international institute, summer school or similar intensive course. Examples of relevant summer schools are given below. However, applications relating to other institutes and summer schools are welcome. Not all are held each year so students are recommended to check websites.

  •     Linguistic Society of America Summer Institute
  •     LOT Summer School (The Netherlands)
  •     The European Summer School of Logic, Language & Information

Applicants should provide a recommendation from their supervisor, a 1-2 page statement as to why they want to go and how it will inform their research, a budget and an indication of other funding options they have available (please check the summer school website for other scholarship options and deadlines).
 

Michael Clyne Prize

Following a very generous contribution by Michael Clyne and also funded by donations in Michael's honour, the annual Michael Clyne Prize has been established for the best postgraduate research thesis in the area of immigrant bilingualism and language contact. This Prize is jointly administered by the Australian Linguistic Society and the Applied Linguistics Association of Australia.

Details of the Prize, including eligibility requirements, timeline and submission process, are as follows:

(a) Prize to be awarded to an MA(research) or PhD thesis examined (or passed by examiners) in the previous year - for example, the 2016 prize will be awarded to an MA(research) or PhD thesis awarded (or passed) in 2015 that focuses on some aspect of immigrant bilingualism and language contact. The thesis should have been submitted at an Australian university.

(b) Submissions should include: (i) a copy of examiners' reports; (ii) a 300-500 word summary of the thesis and its main findings; (iii) a supporting letter from the supervisor, to be submitted by the advertised closing date each year.

(c) Submissions to be assessed by a panel of 3, being the presidents of ALS and ALAA (or suitable representative from each society) and a representative from the area of sociolinguistics to be selected by the two presidents. Membership of the panel is determined on a yearly basis.

(d) Recipient to be notified by the end of June.

(e) Award to be $1,000 cash prize plus contribution of up to $500 to cover costs (e.g. travel, accommodation, conference registration) for the recipient to attend either ALS or ALAA (their choice) to present a paper on their research.

(f) The recipient is to have a guaranteed slot in the conference of their choosing (i.e. either ALS or ALAA in the year of the award) since the reviewing of their abstract has been achieved via the award process.

(g) Summary of thesis to be published in newsletters of both associations when award is announced.

(h) Award to be announced at the AGMs of each society (presumably recipient will be present at (at least) one of these).

(i) Information about the prize, including a list of recipients, to be linked to both ALAA and ALS web pages.

(j) The prize will not be awarded in a given year if none of the applicants reach a suitable standard (as determined by the panel).
 

Submissions for 2016 Michael Clyne Prize

The Applied Linguistics Association of Australia and the Australian Linguistic Society invite submissions for the annual Michael Clyne Prize, to be awarded to the best PhD or MA (Research) with a focus on some aspect of immigrant bilingualism and language contact. The thesis must have been passed or the degree awarded at an Australian university in 2015.

The winner will be awarded a $1,000 cash prize and a contribution of up to $500 to cover costs (e.g. travel, accommodation, conference registration) for the recipient to attend either ALS or ALAA in 2016 to present a paper on the research. The recipient will be guaranteed a slot at their chosen conference.

Submissions should include: (i) a copy of the examiners' reports; (ii) a 300-500 word summary of the thesis and its main findings; (iii) a supporting letter from the supervisor(s).

Further details of rules governing the prize are listed above.
 

The Gerhardt Laves Scholarship

In 2006 the Australian Linguistic Society established the annual Gerhardt Laves Scholarship to encourage postgraduate researchers into the field of indigenous languages, by helping cover linguistic fieldwork expenses. Details of the Scholarship, including eligibility requirements, and the application process and timing, are as follows:

(a) The Gerhardt Laves Scholarship is open to students who are (i) enrolled in a University undertaking an Honours or postgraduate research degree; and (ii) undertaking fieldwork on an indigenous language of Australia or its immediate region as part of their research towards that degree.

(b) Retrospective claims for fieldwork already conducted or begun in 2016 prior to the application round will be considered.

(c) Applications should include: (i) the completed Scholarship application form; and (ii) a supporting letter from the supervisor.

(d) Applications are assessed by a panel of 3 ALS members selected by the president who have interests in field-based linguistics. Membership of the panel is determined on a yearly basis.

(e) The scholarship consists of an amount, approximately $2,000, to cover costs (e.g. travel, accommodation, subsistence, consultant's payments, etc.) that the recipient will encounter in undertaking fieldwork. A year's membership of the Australian Linguistic Society is also provided.

(f) Scholarship recipients are asked to account for their budget in a letter to the ALS president within 12 months and return any unspent funds to ALS. A list of recipients is maintained on the ALS website.

(g) The scholarship may not be awarded in any given year if none of the applicants are of a suitable standard (as determined by the panel).

 

The Jalwang Scholarship

1. Purpose

The purpose of the award is to support linguists to give back to the community by converting some of their research into materials of benefit to the language speakers, for example by producing community materials in the language or engaging in language maintenance or revitalisation activities. The award aims at supporting researchers who have less access to funding and resources than established academics. This would include support for postgraduate students who would like to take time out from their degree-oriented research in order to develop community materials or other community-oriented outcomes during or after completion of the degree.

The name jalwang is the word for the currawong in the Yugambeh language of Southeast Queensland.

2. Frequency

One Scholarship is available each year.

3. Eligibility

Applicants will typically be either currently enrolled students at a University undertaking an Honours or postgraduate research degree or within two years post-completion of a research higher degree, where the focus of the research has been description and documentation of an Indigenous language of Australia or Melanesia (including eastern Indonesia and Timor Leste). Project proposals from applicants other than current or recent students will also be considered. Applicants whose project proposals satisfy the goals of the Scholarship should make a case in their application.

4. Amount

The Scholarship will provide up to $5,000 to pay for such costs as: travel; accommodation in the field; rent at the applicant’s home base while away; materials production; payments to consultants; and contribution towards additional costs of living while in the field. The Scholarship is not intended to provide a living wage or stipend for the recipient.

5. Note

The Scholarship may not be awarded in any given year if none of the applicants are of a suitable standard (as determined by the panel). A list of recipients will be maintained on the ALS website.

6. Reporting

On completion of the proposed work, successful applicants will be expected to provide a one-page report to the ALS along with a copy of the materials produced, as applicable.

6. Applications

Applicants should complete the application form below, save it as a Word document (.doc or .docx) and email it with supporting documents to ALS Vice president Bill Palmer at bill.palmer@newcastle.edu.au. The closing date for the 2016 round is Friday 19 August 2016. In addition to the basic information provided in the form below, the application must include the following:

  • A maximum 500 word outline of the project aims and goals, specifying in what way the project will benefit members of the community and what the material outcomes of the project will be, if applicable, and making a case for the originality and value of the proposed work and the likelihood that it will be successfully completed with the resources available.
  • A maximum 200 word description of the method to be used to achieve these outcomes.
  • An itemised budget (include a statement of any other funds you have obtained or requested).
  • A letter of support from a referee.

Applicants will be assessed by a panel of 3 ALS members selected by the President who have interests in field-based linguistics and community engagement. Membership of the panel is determined on a yearly basis. Applications will be assessed on the following criteria:

  • Articulation of a clear project concept with concrete and time-limited goals.
  • Demonstrated benefit to the language community of the project.
  • Originality of the proposed project in addressing a gap not currently addressed and/or tackling a task in a new way.
  • Argued capacity of the applicant to produce the specified results with the resources available.
  • Provision of a well-justified budget showing value for money against comparable projects.
Application form

1 Name:

2 Email address:

3 Best contact phone number:

4 Postal address:

5 Institution:

6 Degree you are enrolled in or are a recent graduate of (e.g. Honours, MA, or PhD):

7 Year of enrolment (1st, 2nd, 3rd, recent graduate (giving year of graduation) etc):

8 Name(s) of supervisor(s):

9 Main supervisor’s email address:

10 Main supervisor’s phone number:



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