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Newsletter August 2012

Welcome to the latest Newsletter of the Australian Linguistic Society. As usual, the @ symbol in people's email addresses has been replaced with -at-, and clicking on any link will open that site in a new window.

Check out the information on ALS 2012 and ALS 2013 below, under "Upcoming conferences".

Andrea Schalley

News from the Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity

The Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity is very pleased to announce that we have been awarded a two-year grant (2012-2014) under the Indigenous Languages Support Scheme to gain accreditation of the Documenting and Revitalising Indigenous Languages (DRIL) training program http://www.rnld.org/DRIL. This grant will allow RNLD to develop Certificates III and IV in Documenting and Revitalising Indigenous Languages. The accreditation process is being led by RNLD's Education Officer, Alison Soutar. RNLD has also recently advertised for an Indigenous Co-Director of the DRIL Training Program who will work in partnership with RNLD's Senior Linguist Dr Margaret Florey to support the ongoing delivery and development of this training initiative. Applications for the Co-Director position close on September 7.

Through the next three months, DRIL training workshops will be held at the Far West Language Centre in Ceduna (supporting the revitalisation of Wirangu, Mirning, and Kokatha), in Adelaide (with Adnyamathanha language activists), in Broome (supporting Jabirrjabirr, Nyul-Nyul, and Yawaru) and at Wangka Maya Language Centre in Port Hedland. Central Australian linguist Gavan Breen and Michael Jarrett from the Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative will co-train alongside Margaret Florey at Woorabinda community in central Queensland in October. Regional Community Trainer Brad Steadman continues to hold regular workshops with Ngiyampaa people in Brewarrina, Dubbo and Nyngan.

RNLD moved to larger office premises in central Melbourne in July. Our new address is Suite 1007, 530 Little Collins St, Melbourne, and our phone number is (03) 9041-5474. This move provides us with in-house training space and will allow us to develop a volunteer program, which we expect to announce in the near future.

A number of new members have recently joined RNLD's Advisory Panel, including Penny Phillips from Papulu Apparr-Kari Language Centre in Tennant Creek NT, Leonie Boddington from Irra Wangga language centre in Geraldton WA, Gary Williams from Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative in Nambucca Heads NSW, and Clair Hill from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and the University of Leuven. The panel will meet in Melbourne on Friday 14 September ahead of our AGM which will be held at 4pm on the same day.

Margaret Florey

News from the Language and Culture Research Centre, Cairns Institute, James Cook University

Australian Laureate Fellowship awarded

An Australian Laureate Fellowship was awarded to Distinguished Professor Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald, to work on the project 'How gender shapes the world: a linguistic perspective':

Gender pervades every aspect of life and of living. An understanding of its nature is central to many disciplines. The way gender is articulated shapes the world of individuals, and of the societies they live in. Meanings of genders offer a unique window into how humans construct representations of the world and encode them in their languages. This Australian Laureate Fellowship will advance a novel research program, systematically investigating gender expression and gender socialization across languages and cultures, focusing on Australian immigrant communities and PNG as it strategic neighbour. The cutting-edge program will advance cross-cultural understanding and enhance capacity building within Australia and beyond.

The project will receive total funding of AUD $2,416,141 over five years.

Current fieldwork

  • Dineke Schokkin (PhD student) is working on Paluai, an Oceanic language from the Manus Province (sponsored by Firebird Foundation for Anthropological Research).
  • Juliane Boettger (PhD student) is working on Lele, an Oceanic language from the Manus Province.
  • Grant Aiton (PhD student) is starting his fieldwork on Aimele, a Papuan language from Western Province.

International Workshop 'The grammar of knowledge'

The eleventh International Workshop organised by Aikhenvald and Dixon was held at JCU 16-21 May. The full program can be found towards the end of the February 2012 ALS newsletter.

Short term visitors

  • Prof. Dr. Gerrit J. Dimmendaal, University of Cologne (16-30 July), an expert on Nilo-Saharan, Tima-Katla and numerous other African languages
  • Dr Carola Emkow, MPI Leipzig (29 July-5 August), an expert on Araona (Tacana) starting her work on Benabena, a Papuan language, financed by DoBeS
  • Dr Regina Knapp, MPI Leipzig (29 July-5 August), an expert on Benabena culture and language, financed by DoBeS

Round-table meetings at LCRC

6 JuneAnne SchwarzInterrogatives in Secoya
13 JuneR M W DixonMaking new words: some derivational prefixes in English
20 JuneElena MihasTopics in the grammar of Asheninka Perené
4 JulyAlexandra Y. AikhenvaldA language on the move: the ephemeral nature of linguistic contact in Amazonia
11 JulyDineke SchokkinReferring to space in Paluai
25 JulyHannah SarvasyTopics in Nungon grammar
1 AugustMikko SalminenExpression of property concepts in San Dionisio Huave - verbal and nominal morphology
8 AugustWilliam SteedHomo- and Heterogeneity in southern Wu Chinese lexical tone sandhi

Abstracts are available at the LCRC website.

Local Workshop

A Local Workshop 'Language and kinship' will start on 29 August, with Alexandra Aikhenvald presenting a brief position paper, and other members of the Centre contributing presentations on languages and cultures of their expertise.

Reviews

In his review of Alexandra Aikhenvald's The Manambu language of East Sepik, Papua New Guinea, John Newman, of the University of Alberta, concludes:

in summary, Aikhenvald's grammar of Manambu is a sheer tour de force, not just on account of the thoroughness of the grammatical description and analysis, but equally on account of depth of the engagement of the researcher with the speakers and community as reflected throughout the book. The author speaks of "the intellectual excitement of working out the grammatical system of a previously undescribed language" (p. xv). The publication of the volume has made it possible for us all to share in this excitement, albeit in a secondhand way.

Dineke Schokkin's book 'Ja toch?' Linguistic style, discourse markers and construction of identity by adolescents in Amsterdam (LINCOM Studies in Sociolinguistics 11; Lincom GmbH 2011) was reviewed by Joshua Raclaw, Department of Linguistics, University of Colorado at Boulder, who states that

overall, the book presents a smart, though concise, analysis of a largely undiscussed sociolinguistic phenomenon: the role played by discourse particles in ethnolectal styles. It is likely that the text will pave the way for similar, further research within both sociolinguistics and socially-oriented discourse analysis.
Alexandra (Sasha) Aikhenvald

News from the University of New England

UNE Linguistics would like to welcome Dr Finex Ndhlovu as our newest member of staff. Finex comes to us from University of Fort Hare in East London (South Africa), and was before that a research fellow at Victoria University, Melbourne. Finex's research interests are in language policy and politics, multilingualism, and language and identity formation. He is currently conducting fieldwork in Wagga Wagga and Coffs Harbour, NSW, for the project: "Mapping the Language Practices of African Communities in Regional NSW".

In 2011, Sophie Nicholls successfully completed her PhD thesis, "Referring Expressions and Referential Practice in Roper Kriol (Northern Territory, Australia)." (Supervisors: Brett Baker, Cliff Goddard, Jeff Siegel.) The thesis is available here: https://e-publications.une.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/une:9244 (Apologies for the belated announcement.)

Isabel Tasker's PhD in Linguistics, "The Dynamics of Chinese Learning Journeys: a longitudinal study of adult learners of Mandarin in Australia" recently passed examination with no corrections and extremely positive reports praising the innovative conceptual framework and methodology. (Supervisors: Liz Ellis and Robyn Smyth.) (Soon to be available from: https://e-publications.une.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Index.)

Congratulations, Isabel and Sophie!

Philip Tama, PhD student, is currently undertaking fieldwork in Kondabol (southern New Guinea) on the Taeme language.

Jeff Siegel was again an External Fellow at the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies from 15 May-15 June.

In June, Diana Eades participated in the 3rd ESRC funded workshop at the University of Essex on LADO (Language analysis in the determination of origins of asylum seekers).

And in July, she taught in the intensive Masters program in Forensic Linguistics at Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, and in the 12th International Summer School in Forensic Linguistic Analysis, held this year at the same university.

Liz Ellis was keynote speaker at a conference in the early childhood sector: "Growing up Bilingual in Australia - An Investment" held at the University of Sydney in June, and organised by the Ethnic Child Care, Family and Community Services Cooperative Ltd. She also launched a new DVD: with the same title: "Growing up Bilingual in Australia: an Investment" aimed at parents and educators of young bilingual children.

She gave the second of two training days in August for Centacare staff in Tamworth, NSW on Cross-Cultural Communication: cultural and linguistic diversity in regional family and community services.

Margaret Sharpe is working towards finishing the Yugambeh-Bundjalung dictionary on CD by late this year.

Cindy Schneider, Liz Ellis

News from the Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity

The Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity is very pleased to announce that we have been awarded a two-year grant (2012-2014) under the Indigenous Languages Support Scheme to gain accreditation of the Documenting and Revitalising Indigenous Languages (DRIL) training program http://www.rnld.org/DRIL. This grant will allow RNLD to develop Certificates III and IV in Documenting and Revitalising Indigenous Languages. The accreditation process is being led by RNLD's Education Officer, Alison Soutar. RNLD has also recently advertised for an Indigenous Co-Director of the DRIL Training Program who will work in partnership with RNLD's Senior Linguist Dr Margaret Florey to support the ongoing delivery and development of this training initiative. Applications for the Co-Director position close on September 7.

Through the next three months, DRIL training workshops will be held at the Far West Language Centre in Ceduna (supporting the revitalisation of Wirangu, Mirning, and Kokatha), in Adelaide (with Adnyamathanha language activists), in Broome (supporting Jabirrjabirr, Nyul-Nyul, and Yawaru) and at Wangka Maya Language Centre in Port Hedland. Central Australian linguist Gavan Breen and Michael Jarrett from the Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative will co-train alongside Margaret Florey at Woorabinda community in central Queensland in October. Regional Community Trainer Brad Steadman continues to hold regular workshops with Ngiyampaa people in Brewarrina, Dubbo and Nyngan.

RNLD moved to larger office premises in central Melbourne in July. Our new address is Suite 1007, 530 Little Collins St, Melbourne, and our phone number is (03) 9041-5474. This move provides us with in-house training space and will allow us to develop a volunteer program, which we expect to announce in the near future.

A number of new members have recently joined RNLD's Advisory Panel, including Penny Phillips from Papulu Apparr-Kari Language Centre in Tennant Creek NT, Leonie Boddington from Irra Wangga language centre in Geraldton WA, Gary Williams from Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative in Nambucca Heads NSW, and Clair Hill from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and the University of Leuven. The panel will meet in Melbourne on Friday 14 September ahead of our AGM which will be held at 4pm on the same day.

Margaret Florey

News from the University of Melbourne

Indigenous Language Research Unit

We are thrilled to announce that the Faculty of Arts has agreed to fund a Research Unit in Indigenous Language. The Unit will be housed in the School of Languages and Linguistics, and builds on a highly successful research cluster in the area of Australian indigenous language research. The Unit will be funded initially for a three-year period, and will focus on recording, documenting and researching the variety and range of languages spoken by the indigenous people of Australia.

Core members of the Unit include:

  • Professor Gillian Wigglesworth, School of Languages and Linguistics (Director)
  • Dr Rachel Nordlinger, School of Languages and Linguistics (Deputy Director)
  • Associate Professor Janet Fletcher, School of Languages and Linguistics
  • Dr Ruth Singer, School of Languages and Linguistics
  • Dr Nick Thieberger, School of Languages and Linguistics
  • Dr Jennifer Green, School of Languages and Linguistics

Watch this space for further announcements about our activities once we get the research unit up and running!

Recently completed PhDs

Congratulations to the following students for successful completion of their PhDs:

  • Peter Hurst Reciprocation strategies and the syntax of reciprocal constructions
  • Saya Ike Japanese English as a variety: Features and intelligibility of an emerging variety of English
  • Hyejeong Kim Exploring the construct of aviation communication: A critique of the ICAO language proficiency policy
  • Cara Penry Williams Exploring social meanings of variation in Australian English
  • Belinda Ross Prosody and Grammar in Dalabon and Kayardild
  • Maureen Saclot Event structure in Tagalog
Rachel Nordlinger

News from the University of Adelaide

Indigenous Language Support (ILS) grants 2012-2015
Mobile Language Team (MLT) - Phase Two (3 years total) $1,050,000
Consolidating Kaurna Language Revival (3 years total) $420,000
Trialling community language workers course Teaching an Endangered Aboriginal Language $120,000
Tjurlpu tjurta ngurraritja AntikirrinyaYankunytjatjara --- traditional linguistic and ecological knowledge of native birds $85,000

Kaurna Warra Pintyandi and Dr Rob Amery established the KWP Secretariat with three new part-time jobs advertised.

We hosted a very successful Society for the History of Linguistics in the Pacific (SHLP) conference on 5-6 July, organized by Clara Stockigt in July.

We shall host Australex 2013: Endangered Words, and Signs of Revival, on 25-27 July 2013 --- see http://www.australex.org/a13.html.

Professor Ghil'ad Zuckermann has established 3 new courses: Revival Linguistics: Language Reclamation, Cultural Empowerment and Wellbeing; Language in a Global Society; and Languages in the 21st Century: Cultural Contact and New Words.

Ghil'ad Zuckermann

News from Macquarie University

For news of what's been happening in linguistics at Macquarie Uni, visit http://www.ling.mq.edu.au/news/lingline.htm, where you can see all the latest news or check back in earlier issues of Lingline.

Verna Rieschild

ARC Future Fellowships

Several ARC Future Fellowship in linguistics were awarded:

  • Tim Baldwin, University of Melbourne, to work on the project Information access through web-scale question-answer pair finding, ranking and matching:

    This project will aim to take web search to a new level of sophistication in accepting queries in the form of complex natural language questions, and returning a ranked list of natural language answers automatically extracted from a broad range of web user forums.

    The project will receive a total of $781,971 over five years.

  • Caroline Jones, University of Western Sydney, to work on the project Understanding bilingual language acquisition in northern Indigenous Australia: phonological, lexical, orthographic, and family factors:

    Children's language outcomes are critical for health, social inclusion, education and employment. In northern Australia many Indigenous children grow up as Kriol/English bilinguals in disadvantaged communities; this research will establish the linguistic, educational, and family factors in successful language acquisition for these children.

    The project will receive a total of $695,450 over five years.

  • Paul Sidwell, Australian National University, to work on the project Unlocking the missing Millennia of mainland Southeast Asia:

    This project will reveal the prehistoric transition from Neolithic to Bronze Age in South and Southeast Asia, the missing Millennia of the archaeological record. Sophisticated linguistic analyses, facilitated by innovative computational methods and bioinformatics, reconstruct the languages, migrations, and societies of the region’s oldest cultures.

    The project will receive a total of $682,460 over five years.

  • Marija Tabain, La Trobe University, to work on the project Understanding the sounds of Australia's Indigenous languages:

    Our perception of sounds in a non-native language is strongly influenced by our native language background, yet knowledge of minority and endangered language sounds is almost entirely based on the perceptions of European and Asian language speakers. This project will provide the first large-scale acoustic analyses of Australia's Indigenous languages.

    The project will receive a total of $721,656 over five years.

Congratulations!

Andrea Schalley

Books/Theses

New Books Received, August 2012

The following is a list of publications relating to the study of language, received by the Reviews Editor of the Australian Journal of Linguistics. Note that it is not possible to return books to the publisher, and that acceptance of a book implies no promise that it will be reviewed in the Australian Journal of Linguistics. Reviews are printed as circumstances permit, and copies are sent to the publishers of the works reviewed. If you wish to review a book, please contact the Reviews Editor, Alan Libert (Alan.Libert-at-newcastle.edu.au). Note that many books from previous lists of publications received are still available, so you may want to look at them also. If there is a book you are interested in reviewing but it is not on the list, please contact Alan as it is possible that ALS could then obtain a review copy from the publisher.

  • Aikhenvald, A. Y. (2012) The Languages of the Amazon. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  • Arbib, M. A. (2012) How the Brain Got Language. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  • Bednarek, M. and H. Caple (2012) News Discourse. Continuum, London.
  • Depraetere, I. and C. Langford (2012) Advanced English Grammar. Continuum, London.
  • Fraser, G. and C. Davidson (2012) Analyze Anything: A Guide to Critical Reading and Writing. Continuum, London.
  • Hale, M./Minyjun (2012) Kurlumarniny: We Come from the Desert. Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra.
  • Hoffmann, C. R. (2012) Cohesive Profiling. John Benjamins, Amsterdam/Philadelphia.
  • Łubowicz, A. (2012) The Phonology of Contrast. Equinox, Sheffield.
  • Monaghan, L., J. E. Goodman, and J. M. Robinson, eds. (2012) A Cultural Approach to Interpersonal Communcation (2nd edition). Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford
Alan Libert

Upcoming Conferences

ALS 2012 - Update

A reminder that ALS 2012 will be held at the University of Western Australia from Wednesday 5th to Friday 7th of December. The Australian Linguistics Institute (ALI) Sessions will be held on Tuesday 4th of December, immediately preceding the main conference.

We invite abstracts for papers and posters, both for the general sessions and for the special-interest workshops listed below. The deadline for abstracts is September 21st (though they are welcome earlier). To ensure a smooth reviewing process, please ensure that your abstract follows the Guidelines on the website. For workshops, please see the descriptions online before submitting an abstract.

We also invite enrolments in the six Australian Linguistics Institute (ALI) courses listed below. To attend these courses, register online with one of the ALI + Main conference options. During registration you will need to specify which ALI courses you wish to attend. This is important for providing further pre-course information to you, and for us to allocate rooms. The course descriptions and schedule are available on the website.

Please see the conference website for all other details.

Plenaries

  • Perspectives on Tense-Aspect-Mood-Evidentiality
    Östen Dahl (University of Stockholm)
  • Continuity and Change in Dene (North Slavey, Athabaskan)
    Keren Rice (University of Toronto)
  • Exploring variation and change in minority languages: structural and social issues
    Miriam Meyerhoff (University of Auckland)

ALI Courses (Tuesday 4th December)

Workshops

Conference Themes

In addition to the general papers and other activities, there are three major themes across the ALI courses, plenary lectures, and special-interest workshops:

  • Tense, aspect, mood, and evidentiality.
  • Variation and change.
  • In the field - in the community.

Please see the conference website for details.

Accomodation

Please note that accommodation is under high demand in Perth and you are advised to book as soon as possible. There is a range of room options allocated for the conference at Trinity, a residential college at UWA (motel-style units, ensuite student rooms, student rooms with shared bathroom facilities). Contact Trinity directly for bookings - making sure to specify this conference.

Key Dates

Deadline for proposals for workshops & ALI Sessions:    July 23, 2012
ALI Sessions topics announced: August 20, 2012
Deadline for abstracts for papers and posters: September 21, 2012
Acceptance of abstracts: October 7, 2012
End of earlybird registration rate:October 19, 2012

Contact

als2012-linguistics-at-uwa.edu.au
John Henderson

International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation

The 3rd International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation (ICLDC), “Sharing Worlds of Knowledge,” will be held February 28-March 3, 2013, at the Hawai‘i Imin International Conference Center on the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa campus.

By popular demand, the 3rd ICLDC will be a full day longer than the previous two conferences. The conference program will feature an integrated series of Master Class workshops. An optional Hilo Field Study (on the Big Island of Hawai‘i) to visit Hawaiian language revitalization programs in action will immediately follow the conference (March 4-5).

This year’s conference theme, “Sharing Worlds of Knowledge,” intends to highlight the interdisciplinary nature of language documentation and the need to share methods for documenting the many aspects of human knowledge that language encodes. We aim to build on the strong momentum created by the 1st and 2nd ICLDCs to discuss research and revitalization approaches yielding rich records that can benefit both the field of language documentation and speech communities. We hope you will join us.

For more information, visit our conference website.

Call for proposals

Topics

We especially welcome abstracts that address the conference theme of the interdisciplinary nature of language documentation. Language encodes knowledge from many facets of life: kinship, science, taxonomy, material culture, spirituality, music, and others. We encourage presentations on documenting these topics through the lens of endangered languages.

We are also seeking abstracts on the science of documentation and revitalization. Documentation is usually portrayed as a means of collecting language data, and revitalization is generally seen primarily as a kind of applied work directly benefiting communities. However, each of those domains is a genuine area of research, and we welcome presentations that treat documentation and revitalization not merely as activities, but also as domains requiring theorization in their own right.

In addition to the topics above, we warmly welcome abstracts on other subjects in language documentation and conservation, which may include but are not limited to:

  • Archiving matters
  • Community experiences of revitalization
  • Data management
  • Ethical issues
  • Language planning
  • Lexicography and reference grammar design
  • Methods of assessing ethnolinguistic vitality
  • Orthography design
  • Teaching/learning small languages
  • Technology in documentation – methods and pitfalls
  • Topics in areal language documentation
  • Training in documentation methods – beyond the university
  • Assessing success in documentation and revitalization strategies

Abstract submission

Abstracts should be submitted in English, but presentations can be in any language. We particularly welcome presentations in languages of the region discussed. Authors may submit no more than one individual and one joint (co-authored) proposal.

Abstracts are due by August 31, 2012, with notification of acceptance by October 1, 2012.

We ask for abstracts of no more than 400 words for online publication so that conference participants will have a good idea of the content of your paper, and a 50-word summary for inclusion in the conference program. All abstracts will be submitted to blind peer review by international experts on the topic.

We will only be accepting proposal submissions for papers or posters. We will not be accepting any proposal submission for panel or colloquia presentations this year. Please note that the Advisory Committee may ask that some abstracts submitted as conference talks be presented as posters instead.

Selected authors will be invited to submit their conference papers to the journal Language Documentation & Conservation for publication.

To submit an online proposal, visit our Call for Proposals page.

Scholarships

To help defray travel expenses to come and present at the conference, scholarships of up to US$1,500 will be awarded to the six best abstracts by (i) students and/or (ii) members of an endangered language community who are actively working to document their heritage language and who are not employed by a college or university. If you are eligible and wish to be considered for a scholarship, please select the appropriate "Yes" button on the proposal submission form.

Presentation formats

Papers will be allowed 20 minutes for presentation with 10 minutes of question time.

Posters will be on display throughout the conference. Poster presentations will run during the lunch breaks.

Questions?

Feel free to contact the 3rd ICLDC Organizing Committee at icldc-at-hawaii.edu.

Andrea Schalley

Workshop "Continuity and Change: Grammars of the Pacific"

Date: 27-Oct-2012 - 28-Oct-2012
Location: Canberra, A.C.T., Australia
Contact Person: Rachel Hendery
Meeting Email: rachel.hendery-at-anu.edu.au

An understanding of grammatical change in language provides a window to understanding broader issues relating to language and society, including the linguistic outcomes of social and cultural interaction, the areal distribution of linguistic structures and the social and cognitive motivations of linguistic change. Much of the previous research on grammatical change in the Pacific tends to focus on specific changes within particular regions and/or language groups. This has resulted in careful analyses of grammatical change that have greatly expanded our understanding of the history of Pacific languages. This workshop is a unique opportunity to focus on this research from a new perspective: to begin to compare findings from individual studies and discover what these Pacific case studies contribute to general theories of grammatical change. That is, are there common trends or striking patterns of divergence in grammatical change across the Pacific that warrant explanation? And ! how does broadening the empirical basis of our understanding of grammatical change to incorporate Pacific case studies alter our general view of it?

Plenary Speakers

  • Associate Professor Frank Lichtenberk (University of Auckland)
  • Professor Jeff Siegel (University of New England)

Call for Papers

We would like to invite papers on all topics relating to grammatical change in the Pacific. These can include case studies of individual languages, reconstructions, comparative studies of smaller regions or language groups, or broader typological studies. Studies of mixed languages or new Englishes are also welcome.

We hope that speakers will also participate in two round-table discussions, one on each day of the workshop. One discussion will focus on the question of what the most pressing issues and research priorities relating to this topic are in the various Pacific regions and language families. The other discussion session will focus on trans-regional themes relating to grammatical change. This session will also include a discussion about a proposed database of grammatical change in the Pacific. This database is still in the initial planning stages, and we will appreciate participants' feedback on what sorts of features and focus would be most of use to them.

We hope to publish a collection of papers from this workshop, probably as a special journal issue.

Abstracts

Please send abstracts for a 20 minute paper (with 10 minutes of discussion) to rachel.hendery-at-anu.edu.au by 31 August 2012. We will send out notifications of acceptance by mid-September. Abstracts should be no longer than one A4 page, including references.

There will be no registration charge for the workshop.

Daniel Frost

Australasian Association for Lexicography AUSTRALEX 2013: Endangered Words, and Signs of Revival

Dates: Thursday, 25th - Saturday, 27th July 2013
Location: The University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide City Centre, Australia
Orgnaisers: Professor Ghil‘ad Zuckermann and Dr Julia Miller
Webpage: http://www.australex.org/a13.html

Important dates

  • Abstract Submissions: BY 1 December 2012
  • Notification of Acceptance: BY 1 February 2013

Keynote Speakers

  • Dr Luise Hercus, Australian National University: A Fifty Year Perspective on Endangered Words and Revival: A Golden Jubilee?
  • Professor Christopher Hutton, The University of Hong Kong: Reclaiming Socio-Cultural Memory: Creating a Reference Dictionary of Hong Kong Cantonese Slogans and Quotations.

Focus Speakers

  • Professor Peter Mühlhäusler, The University of Adelaide: Producing a Dictionary for an Unfocused Language: The Case of Pitkern and Norf’k.
  • Dr Michael Walsh, The University of Sydney: Endangered Words in the Archive: The Rio Tinto / Mitchell Library Project.

Celebrations

Australex 2013 will feature scholarly and emotional celebrations, marking (1) Dr Luise Hercus’s 50-year work on Aboriginal languages, (2) Professor Peter Mühlhäusler’s 20-year scholarship at the University of Adelaide, and (3) the 175th anniversary of the Lutheran missionaries' Aboriginal lexicography. On Saturday 27 July 2013 we shall explore the beauty of the Adelaide Hills.

Call for Papers

The study of words may be tedious to the school-boy, as breaking of stones is to the wayside labourer, but to the thoughtful eye of the geologist these stones are full of interest –he sees miracles on the high road, and reads chronicles in every ditch. (P. 2, Vol. 2 of Max Müller 1871, Lectures on the Science of Language. London: Longmans, Green, 6th Edition (1st Edition: 1861))

The theme for Australex 2013 is ‘Endangered Words, and Signs of Revival’. Original and perspicacious papers --- from all disciplines, subfields and schools of study --- may address a wide range of topics associated with lexicography, lexicology, endangered languages, Revival Linguistics, semantics, endangered meanings, extinct concepts, contact linguistics, social empowerment through language, and words, culture and identity. Topics may include dictionaries in Indigenous, minority and other endangered communities, dialectal lexicons, the educational and cultural roles of dictionaries, talknological dictionaries, dictionaries and Native Tongue Title, lexical engineering, and language policy and lexicography. Papers can address controversies such as the ‘Give us authenticity or give us death’ argument and the descriptive/prescriptive debate. Other topics may include learners’ dictionaries, specialist dictionaries, phraseology, slang, proverbs, onomastics and terminology. All welcome.

If you would like to propose a panel or submit a paper or a poster, would you please email an abstract of no more than 400 words in a Word document to julia.miller-at-adelaide.edu.au by 1 December 2012. Abstracts may include up to 5 references. Notification of acceptance will be sent out BY 1 February 2013. Would you please feel free to submit your abstract as soon as possible. Early submissions will receive early notifications.

Bursaries

Up to two student bursaries are available to assist full-time students from Australia and New Zealand to attend the conference and present a paper.

Please see http://www.australex.org/bursary.htm for further details.

Ghil'ad Zuckermann

ALS Conference 2013

The dates for ALS 2013 have been finalised as 2nd-4th October 2013. Put it in your calendar now! A website should be up and running soon. ALS 2013 will be held at the University of Melbourne.

Rachel Nordlinger

Jobs, grants, and scholarships

ALS Scholarships and Prizes: 2012 Announcement

We are delighted to announce the 2012 awardees of the ALS Scholarships and Prize:

  • Gerhardt Laves Scholarship:
    Tim Connell, an MA student at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, to undertake field work on a language referred to locally as Matek, an undescribed language of West Kalimantan, Indonesia, which belongs to the Land Dayak subgroup of Austronesian
  • Susan Kaldor Scholarship:
    Qandeel Hussain, PhD student at Macquarie University, to attend summer school courses at the Linguistic Society of America Institute
  • Michael Clyne Prize:
    Donna Butorac from the Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University, for her PhD thesis, 'Imagined identity, remembered self: Settlement language learning and the negotiation of gendered subjectivity'

Congratulations to the 2012 awardees!

Please see http://www.als.asn.au/scholarships/2012_recipients.html for more information.

Caroline Jones

PhD Scholarship – Understanding bilingual language acquisition in northern indigenous Australia

A three-year PhD scholarship is available within an Australian Research Council funded project to learn more about how indigenous children acquire Kriol and English in northern Australia. Several PhD project choices are possible. Applicants should hold an excellent Bachelor Honours degree, or equivalent qualifications and/or research experience. The PhD student will be enrolled at MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney (Bankstown campus). Start date is negotiable. The scholarship provides a funded PhD place, annual (indexed) stipend of $33,728 AUD, and support for conference attendance and fieldwork. MARCS Institute is a vibrant interdisciplinary research institute with excellent facilities, particularly for phonetics and psycholinguistics, and a rich environment of support and academic expertise. Australian or international applicants are welcome. Potential applicants are encouraged to contact the project leader Dr Caroline Jones (carjones-at-uow.edu.au) by 31 October 2012 to discuss their proposal.

For more information on how to apply, visit: http://www.uws.edu.au/research/scholarships (see MARCS Institute scholarships; also Yarramundi scholarships).

Caroline Jones

Contract/casual staff at UNE

Linguistics UNE is compiling a register of contract/casual academic staff.

This will be a list of suitably qualified, and potentially interested linguists/applied linguists, whom we may contact when we are in a position to offer occasional periods of contract/casual work.

In the past, the contributions of contract/casual staff have been important to our undergraduate and postgraduate programs, particularly during unforeseen staff shortages. We see an ongoing role for contract/casual staff in our programs.

As in the past, the nature of any future work required of our contract/casual staff will vary. It has previously included the coordination and delivery of on-campus and off-campus units of study, the design and development of unit content, the monitoring of online student discussion forums, and the grading of student work.

We invite linguistics graduates of any level of experience to contact us if they would like to be included in our register of contract/casual staff. Please send an electronic copy of your CV to LING-at-une.edu.au. In the body of the email, please state in list form: (1) your fields of expertise, and (2) the unit code of the UNE linguistics units you think you could contribute to.

Our contract/casual staff are not necessarily required to be located physically on campus; people based outside of Armidale are encouraged to apply.

Please note: LING-at-une.edu.au is a no-reply address.

Cindy Schneider

University of Melbourne: Professor in Applied Linguistics & Director of the Language Testing Research Centre

The School of Languages and Linguistics is currently looking for a Professor in Applied Linguistics & Director of the Language Testing Research Centre. See the following website for job details, and please pass this information on to any suitable candidates: http://jobs.unimelb.edu.au/jobDetails.asp?sJobIDs=831808&stp=AW&sLanguage=en.

Rachel Nordlinger

AIATSIS/ANU Summer Research Scholarship Program 2012/13

The ANU School of Language Studies (SLS) and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Studies (AIATSIS) are pleased to announce they will co-host two Summer Research Scholars in the 2012/13 round.

Outstanding undergraduate and honours students working on Australian languages are encouraged to apply, in particular those of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background. All students will find AIATSIS and SLS welcoming and academically engaging places to be.

A Summer Research Scholarship includes:

  • Return travel from a student's place of Australian residence to The Australian National University
  • accommodation and all meals on campus from 26 November 2012 to 24 January 2013, and
  • a weekly stipend.

For background and projects see http://cass.anu.edu.au/scholarships/srs/summer-research-scholarship-program-2012-2013.

Full details of award conditions, key dates and application processes are available on the ANU Summer Research Scholarships website.

Jane Simpson

AIATSIS/ANU Summer Research Scholarship Program 2012/13

The ANU School of Language Studies (SLS) and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Studies (AIATSIS) are pleased to announce they will co-host two Summer Research Scholars in the 2012/13 round.

Outstanding undergraduate and honours students working on Australian languages are encouraged to apply, in particular those of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background. All students will find AIATSIS and SLS welcoming and academically engaging places to be.

A Summer Research Scholarship includes:

  • Return travel from a student's place of Australian residence to The Australian National University
  • accommodation and all meals on campus from 26 November 2012 to 24 January 2013, and
  • a weekly stipend.

For background and projects see http://cass.anu.edu.au/scholarships/srs/summer-research-scholarship-program-2012-2013.

Full details of award conditions, key dates and application processes are available on the ANU Summer Research Scholarships website.

Jane Simpson

AIATSIS Centre for Australian Languages (ACAL) Scholarship to attend ALS 2012 in Perth

Students interested in research on Australian languages are invited to apply for a scholarship to attend the 2012 Australian Linguistic Society (ALS) conference in Perth. ACAL is offering up to $1,500 to cover the cost of registration, on-campus accommodation (standard student room), and flights to and from Perth (lowest fare). Successful applicants will be expected to attend the whole conference and, where appropriate, the Australian Linguistics Institute. Priority will be given to applicants who fit one or more of the following categories:

  • Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
  • Involved with Australian languages
  • Presenting a paper at ALS
  • First-time ALS attendee

Details for the conference can be found at https://bookings.arts.uwa.edu.au/ocs/index.php/linguistics/linguistics2012.

For application forms and enquiries email language-at-aiatsis.gov.au with the subject heading 'ALS scholarship'.

Applications close 10 October 2012.

Kazuko Obata

About ALS

The Australian Linguistic Society is the national organization for linguists and linguistics in Australia. Its primary goal is to further interest in and support for linguistics research and teaching in Australia. Further information about the Society is available by clicking here.

The ALS Newsletter is issued four times per year, in the middle of February, May, August and November. Information for the Newsletter should be sent to the Editor, Andrea Schalley (a.schalley-at-griffith.edu.au) by the end of the first week of February, May, August and November. There is a list of people who are automatically advised that it's time to contribute material; if you wish to be added to that list, send Andrea an email.

Unless you paid for several years at a time, or have given the Treasurer your credit card details and permission to use it, subscriptions for ALS are due at the beginning of each calendar year; the year you are paid up to is shown on the address label on the envelope your copy of the Australian Journal of Linguistics comes in. A subscription form is available by clicking here.

The only membership list is maintained by the Treasurer, Doug Absalom (doug.absalom-at-gmail.com). If you wish to check your membership status, change your address or make some other enquiry, please contact Doug.



by Dr. Radut