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Newsletter August 2014

Welcome to the latest Newsletter of the Australian Linguistic Society.

As usual, the @ symbol in people's email addresses has been replaced with -at-, and clicking on any link will open that site in a new window.

Enjoy!

Andrea Schalley

Australian Linguistic Society - 45th Annual Conference

University of Newcastle, 10-12 December 2014
http://www.als.asn.au/conferences/newcastle-2014

Plenary Speakers

  • Professor Isabelle Bril (CNRS)
  • Dr Pia Lane (University of Oslo)
  • Professor Paul Smolensky (Johns Hopkins University)

Call for Papers

The Australian Linguistic Society annual conference welcomes papers on any topic within the fields of general linguistics, applied linguistics, and sociolinguistics. Papers are 20min presentation + 10min question time.

Submission Deadline: 5 September 2014

Abstract Format

Document format: pdf required

Page Limits: 1 page of text (including title of paper) + 1 page of references, diagrams, example sentences, figures, keywords, tables
Font size: Font must be 12 point
Margins: 2cm on all margins

All abstracts will be reviewed anonymously. The abstract should not include the author’s name, affiliation, or other identifying information. Be careful that your name and email are not automatically embedded by your word processor.

Author Information

Please provide a separate document listing the paper title and providing all relevant author information. If you are interested in submitting your paper for one of the workshops, please state which workshop you wish to be considered for. Workshops are listed on the website.

Abstract and Author Information Submission

Please submit abstracts and author information as attachments in an email message to als2014-at-newcastle.edu.au.

Notifications of acceptance or rejection: 10 October 2014.

Please note that ALS policy requires that presenters should be members of the ALS.

Mark Harvey

News from the University of Sydney

1.

The Linguistics Department at the University of Sydney has recently made three new hires; all will begin in early 2015:

Nick Enfield will take up the position of Professor and Chair of Linguistics at USYD after 14 years in the Language and Cognition Group at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands. Nick has recently published a monograph on language and human sociality (‘Relationship Thinking: Agency, Enchrony, and Human Sociality’, Oxford, 2013) and has co-edited ‘The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Anthropology’ (Cambridge, 2014, with Paul Kockelman and Jack Sidnell). He has two books in press: ‘The Utility of Meaning: What Words Mean and Why’ (Oxford) and ‘Mainland Southeast Asian Languages: The State of the Art’ (Mouton, co-edited with Bernard Comrie).

Sebastian Fedden (PhD U Melb 2007) will join USYD as a lecturer in morphosyntax. Sebastian recently won the Association for Linguistic Typology’s Georg von der Gabelentz Award for the best grammar of a language published globally in the 4-year period 2009-12 (his grammar was on the Papuan language Mian). He has recently been working in Greville Corbett's ‘Surrey Morphology Group’, doing grammatical typology within the rigorous and common sense ‘Canonical Typology’ framework that Corbett and colleagues have been developing.

Gwendolyn Hyslop (PhD U Oregon 2011) will join USYD as a lecturer in phonetics and phonology. Gwen wrote a reference grammar of the Tibeto-Burman language Kurtöp, spoken in Bhutan (the grammar is now in press with Brill publishers). Gwen’s work has a typological orientation, with a specialization in laboratory phonology (tonogenesis being one of her core interests) and in endangered language description. She has a special commitment to the sociolinguistic dimensions of her extensive field work in Bhutan. Gwen currently holds an ARC Discovery Grant for ‘Reconstructing Eastern Himalayan Histories’, 2014-2016.

2.

A major honour for Jim Martin: Shanghai Jiao Tong University has established “The Martin Centre for Appliable Linguistics”, an internationally oriented research center focusing on systemic functional linguistics and its applications. The Centre is named after Prof J R Martin, and was officially launched at Shanghai Jiao Tong University on 12 April 2014. See here for more information: http://sfl.sjtu.edu.cn/martincentre/index.html

3.

USYD will be host to Myfany Turpin, who has been awarded an ARC Future Fellowship, which she will take up at the Conservatorium of Music, beginning in November 2014. The Project aims to develop a typology of Australian Aboriginal ceremonies based on their structural features. By mapping their distribution and comparing these with linguistic and anthropological evidence it aims to provide insights into Indigenous prehistory and cultural diffusion across arid Australia. The project will also lead to a greater understanding of Aboriginal song-poetry and provide further opportunities for Indigenous people to engage in their traditional performance arts.

4.

Monika Bednarek has been awarded ARC Linkage funding, together with Tim Dwyer and Fiona Martin (also in the USYD School of Letters, Arts, and Media) and Associate Professor James Curran from the School of IT, along with industry partnership from Mi9 and Share Wars in the first Australian study to analyse the scale, scope, forms and implications of online news-sharing on Facebook and Twitter.

5.

Nina Rubino has recently published this book:

Rubino, A. (April 2014). Trilingual talk in Sicilian-Australian migrant families: Playing out identities through language alternation. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. http://www.palgraveconnect.com/pc/doifinder/10.1057/9781137383686

From the overview: This book is an indepth study of the linguistic dynamics among Sicilian migrants in Australia, one of the largest regional groups in the context of Italian emigration. Through conversations gathered within the family, language choice and language alternation among Sicilian, English and Italian are explored in talk between first and second generation. The analytical approach combines the interactional with the language and identity perspective, focusing on code-switching as a strategy to construct and contest conversational and social identities. A corpus of quantitative surveys and other Sicilian-Australian voices gathered through interviews complement the conversational data, contributing to the representation of the linguistic and cultural identities of Sicilian migrants. The study is placed in the context of the family migrant experience and the shifting attitudes towards immigrant languages in Australia.

Nina’s book will be launched by Ken Cruickshank on Friday 26 September, 6.00pm for 6.30pm at Gleebooks, 49 Glebe Point Road Glebe NSW 2037 Sydney.

6.

A new book has just been published as the result of a collaboration among USYD linguists on the topic of language and identity, edited by Novi Djenar, Ahmar Mahboob, and Ken Cruickshank:

Djenar, D. (Ed.), Mahboob, A. (Ed.) & Cruickshank, K. (Ed.) (2014). Language and Identity Across Modes of Communication. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter Mouton. http://www.degruyter.com/view/product/206486

From the overview: This edited collection examines how people use a range of different modalities to negotiate, influence, and/or project their own or other people’s identities. It brings together linguistic scholars concerned with issues of identity through a study of language use in various types of written texts, conversation, performance, and interviews.

7.

The USYD Department of Linguistics has recently moved from the Transient Building, where it has long been housed, to the north west corner of the John Woolley Building.

Nick Enfield

News from the University of Queensland

Ilana Mushin and Rod Gardner (Griffith) have received a grant from the Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment for the project 'Language and cultural diversity in early years schooling'. The project continues our research into the ways that children and teachers manage language and cultural differences between the Standard Australian English of the classroom and the home language background of Indigenous children in communities where traditional languages are no longer spoken. Most of the work so far as examined schools in remote communities, where the children come from very similar cultural backgrounds. Our project will examine language and interactional practices around Indigenous children in an urban school that itself is highly cultrally diverse ­ a very common schooling context for Indigenous children. We will be using Conversation Analytic methods to examine especially interactions around childrens' engagement and orientation to learning.

Erich Round will be a senior collaborator on a three year NSF grant awarded to Claire Bowern (Yale), "Australian Language Typology and History: A Reevaluation". Among other plans, the grant aims to bring two UQ linguistics undergraduates to Yale for a month in 2015 and 2016 to participate on the research project.

Myfany Turpin has has been awarded an ARC Future Fellowship at the University of Sydney. Her project aims to develop a typology of Australian Aboriginal ceremonies by classifying them according to their structural features. By mapping their distribution and comparing these with linguistic and anthropological evidence it seeks to provide insights into Indigenous prehistory and cultural diffusion across arid Australia. This project aims to lead to a greater understanding of the ecological knowledge contained in songs and increased Indigenous knowledge of, and engagement in, ceremonial life.

Myfany Turpin was also award an ARC Linkage at the University of Sydney with Linda Barwick, Rachel Nordlinger and Jenny Green in collaboration with the Brian Connelly at Central Land Council to apply current research on archiving and community access to find practical solutions to managing the large amounts of recorded cultural material of interest to the Central Land Council, the peak Indigenous representative body covering the southern half of the Northern Territory. The project aims to identify and integrate information in a common database, work with community members to create a prioritised list of any at-risk materials and apply locally meaningful categories for managing the archival materials relevant to their community, and deliver appropriate documentation of process, permissions and reports to support ongoing sustainability of the collections.

Felicity Meakins and Penny Smith were awarded an ABA grant to produce a book written in Gurindji and translated into English which describes Gurindji history from the perspective of Gurindji historians and artists. The project will be auspiced by Karungkarni Arts (Kalkaringi) and is a larger collaboration with Erika Charola, the Central Land Council ranger group, and Brenda L Croft (UNSW). The book will accompany a travelling exhibition in 2016 curated by Brenda L Croft, former Indigenous curator of the National Gallery of Australia.

David Osgarby was the Valedictorian at the recent Humanities and Social Sciences graduation where he also graduated with first class Honours with a thesis on nominal morphology in Ngarnka (supervised by Rob Pensalfini and Felicity Meakins).

Felicity Meakins

News from the Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages (VACL)

Three New Books Launched

After several years of research, the Victorian Aboriginal Corporation of Languages (VACL) held a multi-book launch on the 10th of June to celebrate the release of three new publications. Each of these publications plays a role in celebrating VACL’s 20th year of language revival in Victoria.

The Journey Cycles of the Boonwurrung – 2nd Edition builds on the first edition written by Aunty Carolyn Briggs, and is a compilation of traditional Boonwurrung stories written with Boonwurrung Language. The book is significant in raising awareness of the connection to country, language and heritage for the people living on Boonwurrung land.

tyama-teeyt yookapa: Interviews from the Meeting Point Project is a collection of stories, reflections and hopes about Language revival in Australian Aboriginal communities extracted from a series of interviews carried out during 2009-10. It contains insights into every aspect of language revival from culture, relationships and identity, through grammar, sounds and spelling, to considerations of collaborative research and the meaning of authenticity.

The Journal of Assistant Protector William Thomas 1839-67 has been released as a four-volume set.  These books contain extensive transcribed and annotated text, images of the original text, and a volume of the Kulin language drawn from Thomas’s journals. Thomas is one of the few Europeans who described the cultural life of Aboriginal Australians with a sense of empathy; as a result his journals are one of the most important primary sources in Australian history.

The release of these new publications is part of the continuing movement to retrieve, revive and strengthen Indigenous Languages for Aboriginal people in Australia and demonstrates VACL’s continued commitment to supporting communities in the revival of Indigenous Languages for Aboriginal people in Australia.

See link: http://vaclang.org.au/blog/sneak-peek-into-upcoming-books.html

Nyernila Book Launch at Bunjilaka, Melbourne Museum

The Hon Heidi Victoria MP, Minister for the Arts, launched a new publication of Aboriginal Creation Stories of Victoria Nyernila: Listen Continuously.

Following the success of the Kulin Creation Stories Booklet published in collaboration with Arts Victoria, we have extended this project and are pleased to announce the publication of 'Nyernila, Listen Continuously: Aboriginal Creation Stories of Victoria'. Nyernila brings together stories of creation and Aboriginal life from Koorie communities across Victoria, capturing over 18 language groups.

"Language connects to spirit and the land. Languages uphold and reinforce Indigenous world-views held by previous generations. Reviving and maintaining language is core to reviving cultural and spiritual practices. Aboriginal knowledge is a resource to everyone and this publication provides an insight into the diversity and depth of Aboriginal people's connections to the land."  Paul Paton, Executive Officer, Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages

"Our stories are our Law. They are important learning and teaching for our People. They do not sit in isolation in a single telling. They are accompanied by song, dance and visual communications; in sand drawings, ceremonial objects and body adornment, rituals and performance. Our stories have come from 'wanggatung-waliyt' - long, long ago - and remain ever-present through into the future."  Vicki Couzens, Project Co-ordinator, Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages

See link: http://vaclang.org.au/blog/victorian-aboriginal-creation-stories-publication-launch-at-bunjilaka.html

Swan Hill Primary School Language Program Kicks Off!

On the 7th of May 2014, Swan Hill Primary School became the most recent school to take part in the pilot trial to introduce Aboriginal languages in Victorian schools, following Thornbury Primary School and Heywood & District Secondary College. 

Wemba Wemba language, traditionally spoken in and around the Swan Hill (Wanilu) region is being taught by Wemba Wemba descendant, LAECG Chair and VACL board member Aunty Stephanie Charles. The program is being taught initially to Year 1 students who have so far learnt about some of the local birds, including the Wemba Wemba totem Wiran the red-tailed black cockatoo, greetings, family members and body parts through repetition, gesture, songs and memory games, including 'heads, shoulders, knees and toes' & 'hokey pokey'.  

Swan Hill Primary School Principal Janet Mullenger-Barnard says "the students are very excited and classroom teachers sit in on the lessons so they can use the language throughout the week".    

See link: http://vaclang.org.au/projects/swan-hill-primary-school.html
And also news about Heywood & District Secondary College language program: http://www.vaclang.org.au/projects/heywood-district-secondary-college.html
And Thornbury Primary School Language program: http://www.vaclang.org.au/projects/thornbury-primary-school.html

Funding for digital projects

See links to three new projects:

http://www.vaclang.org.au/projects/qbook-digital-resources.html
http://www.vaclang.org.au/projects/schools-digital-resources-project.html

http://www.vaclang.org.au/projects/qbook-digital-language-resources-for-south-west-victoria.html

Emma Hutchinson

News from the University of Melbourne

New staff

Jill Vaughan and John Mansfield have both recently joined us as postdoctoral researchers associated with the Research Unit for Indigenous Language.  Jill is working ACLA2 project and on language ecologies and language choice in multilingual Maningrida.  John has joined the Language Acquisition in Murrinh-Patha project and will look particularly at the features of the input to children learning Murrinh-Patha in Wadeye.

New RHD completions

Congratulations to the following students for successful RHD completions in the past few months:

  • Aidan Wilson (MA Research): Tiwi revisited: a reanalysis of Traditional Tiwi verb morphology
  • Erin Moore (PhD): Anyway, what have discourse markers got to do with grammar and stuff like that? A unified account of the discourse-­pragmatic and grammatical aspects of discourse markers
  • Sabina Vakser (PhD): "Kak myi codeswitchaem”: The range of Russianness in Melbourne
  • Clarence Green (PhD): Corpus-based explorations of combined clause hierarchy, diachronic syntax and discourse-pragmatic coherence

New projects/grants

We are thrilled that Nick Thieberger was successful in the recent Future Fellowship round! Nick’s project will investigate new tools and research methods for creating better records of Indigenous languages in Australia and the Pacific, and will begin in September 2014.

Rachel Nordlinger

News from La Trobe University

Linguistics/CRLD Visiting Fellows

The La Trobe University Linguistics Discipline Research Program is re-instating the Centre for Research on Language Diversity visiting scholars scheme. Scott DeLancey of the University of Oregon will be hosted by the CRLD during August in conjunction with a visit to UNE. He will be presenting a seminar on August 20th on ‘Sociopragmatic Effects in "Hierarchical" Verb Agreement Systems in Tibeto-Burman’. We will also be welcoming Katherine Demuth from Macquarie University, who is presenting a seminar on September 10th on ‘Prosodic Constraints on Children’s Perception and Production of Inflectional Morphemes’. Alexei Kochetov from the University of Toronto will also be visiting the CRLD during November, and will be presenting a seminar on ‘Phonetic typology of retroflexes: An articulatory study of Kannada’. Laurent Sagart, as senior researcher at the Centre de recherches linguistiques sur l'Asie orientale, is also a CRLD guest in November, presenting his seminar ‘A new reconstruction of Old Chinese’ on November 17th.

New Members at La Trobe Linguistics/CRLD

We have some new research students who have recently begun their PhD candidature with Adam Schembri as principal supervisor. Farag Hanna is a new student from Egypt who is interested in undertaking research on signed/spoken language bilingual approaches to the education of deaf children. Kirri Dangerfield is an Auslan/English interpreter planning to undertake a study into aspects of team interpreting (i.e. situations where two or more interpreters work together). Catherine Treloar is beginning a study of signed vs. spoken language use and shifting notions of Deaf identity.

New Publications

Schembri, A. & Lucas, C. (Eds.), ‘Sociolinguistics and Deaf Communities’ is in production with Cambridge University Press, with an expected publication date of February 2015. The first of its kind, the ‘Assessing Auslan Development’ kit for teachers working with deaf signing children (adapted from the British Sign Language Production and Receptive Skills Tests by Adam Schembri, Gabrielle Hodge and Ida Rogers) was also recently published by the Victorian Deaf Education Institute (part of Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development). 

Marija Tabain, Janet Fletcher and Andrew Butcher (2014). ‘Lexical stress in Pitjantjatjara’, Journal of Phonetics, Volume 42, January 2014, pp 52-66. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0095447013000909)

Marija Tabain and Andrew Butcher (2014). ‘Pitjantjatjara’. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, Volume 44, Issue 02, August 2014, pp 189-200. (http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0025100314000073)

Conferences

Marija Tabain, on behalf of the Australasian Speech Science and Technology Association, is exploring the possibility of a bid for the International Congress of the Phonetic Sciences to be held in Melbourne in 2019. If you are interested in being involved, please contact Marija at m.tabain-at-latrobe.edu.au.

Adam Schembri delivered a keynote presentation ’Sociolinguistic variation and change in sign languages’ at the NWAV Asia Pacific 3 Conference at Victoria University Wellington. He is also presenting at the ‘Current Issues in Sign Linguistics’  International Summer School at Charles University Prague in August (http://ujkn.ff.cuni.cz/en/CISL). 

Theses

We congratulate Adele Gregory on completing her PhD entitled ‘The laryngeal aspects of infant language acquisition’; Henriette Daudey on passing her PhD dissertation entitled ‘A grammar of Wadu Pumi’, and Dionysis Mertyris for submitting his thesis ‘The loss of the genitive in Greek: A diachronic and dialectological analysis’.

General news

Birgit Hellwig left La Trobe University in early 2014 to take up a position at the University of Cologne. We wish Birgit all the best in her new position and are pleased to report that she will remain associated with the CRLD by taking up an honorary position with us.

Previous Seminars in 2014

  • Wednesday 9 April: Pandora Petrovska – ‘Writing about the Macedonian language’
  • Wednesday 23 April: Adam Schembri – ‘Indicating verbs in British Sign Language, a quantitative investigation’
  • Wednesday 30 April: Marija Tabain – ‘Stress effects on stop burst spectra in four languages: A comparison of 3-,4-,5- and 6-place systems’
  • Wednesday 7 May: David Bradley – ‘Time Ordinals in Tibeto-Burman’
  • Wednesday 14 May: Sujinat Jitwiriyanont – ‘Northern Pa-A tones revisited’
  • Wednesday 21 May: Alex Marley –  ‘Language choice in Raunsepna: Exploring signs of language shift in a Papua New Guinea community’
  • Wednesday 4 June: Tim Brickell – Tondano pronominal clitics: Philippine-type or Indonesian-type?
  • Thursday, 19 June: Sharon Shan – ‘Classifiers in Cantonese, a ‘super mighty category’ from a typological perspective’

Forthcoming Seminars in 2014

  • Wednesday, 20 August: Scott DeLancey – ‘Sociopragmatic Effects in "Hierarchical" Verb Agreement Systems in Tibeto-Burman’
  • Wednesday, 3 September: Herbert Tunzhi – ‘Consonant clusters in Ergong’; and Jianfu Li – ‘Consonant Clusters of Namuyi Phonology’
  • Wednesday, 10 September: Katherine Demuth – ‘Prosodic Constraints on Children’s Perception and Production of Inflectional Morphemes’
  • Wednesday, 17 September: Stephen Morey – Classifying the Tangsa linguistic varieties
  • Wednesday, 15 October: Howard Nicholas and Donna Starks – ‘Introducing Multiplicity’
  • Wednesday, 29 October: Rachel Nordlinger – 'Towards a structural typology of possession’
  • Wednesday, 12 November: Alexei Kochetov –  ‘Phonetic typology of retroflexes: An articulatory study of Kannada’
  • Monday, 17 November: Laurent Sagart – ‘A new reconstruction of Old Chinese’
Adam Schembri

News from the University of New England

Margaret Sharpe is working with Cat Kutay and April Mills-Thom with editing the All Yugambeh-Bundjalung dictionary for online access, including some audio material. She is carrying out similar work with Cat Kutay for the Alawa-Kriol-English dictionary, as well as some work with the Muurrbay Aboriginal Co-operative at Nambucca Heads on classes in Bundjalung.

Sophia Waters submitted her PhD, entitled "The cultural semantics of 'sociality' terms in Australian English, with contrastive reference to French" on 29th July (Supervisors: Prof. Cliff Goddard (adjunct) and Dr Liz Ellis).

Associate Professor Charlotte Gooskens has become a UNE Linguistics adjunct. Charlotte is based at the University of Groningen and she researches mutual intelligibility and dialect distance between closely related languages and dialects.

Liz Ellis

News from James Cook University (Language and Culture Research Centre)

LCRC Visiting Fellows

Professor Dr Lourens de Vries is a winner of an International Collaborative Award and Partner Investigator within the ARC Discovery Project 'How languages differ and why' (Chief Investigators: Aikhenvald and Dixon), and member of the International Consultative Board of LCRC. He is Professor of General Linguistics and Bible translation at the Free University of Amsterdam, and an expert in description, typology and history of Papuan languages of New Guinea, with special focus on the province of Papua. He is visiting LCRC from 1 July until 1 September 2014. During his stay, he is working on a book with the working title The Greater Awyu language family of West Papua. History, Typology, Diversity'.

Dr Azeb Amha, of the University of Leiden, an expert on Omotic and Cushitic languages, is a Visiting Fellow at LCRC from June to September 2014, working on various issues in Omotic languages, concentrating on aspects of noun classification systems, within the framework of the ARC DP 'The world through the prism of language: a cross-linguistic view of genders, noun classes and classifiers'.

Dr René van den Berg, Linguistics Consultant of SIL at Ukarumpa, PNG, and member of the International Consultative Board of LCRC is an expert on Austronesian languages. He is visiting LCRC in August-September 2014, to continue his research on pronominal systems in Western Oceanic languages, with an aim of writing a monograph 'Pronominal systems in Western Oceanic: typology and diachrony'.

Martin Kohlberber, a PhD student at Leiden University, is working on a comperehensive grammar of Shiwiar, a Jivaroan language. He is visiting LCRC in August-September 2014, working on various issues in Shiwiar and other Jivaroan languages, in close cooperation with Dr Simon Overall.

Katherine Bolaños, a PhD student at MPI (Leipzig) and the University of Texas (Austin), is working on a comprehensive grammar of Kakua, a Makú language of north-west Amazonia. She has undertaken pioneering work on Cabiyari, a previously undescribed Arawak language spoken in the Colombian Vaupés. She will spend six weeks at LCRC in August-September 2014, working on the Cabiyari materials, jointly with Alexandra Aikhenvald.

Dr Vito Bongiorno (University of Bonn), an expert on Quechua and Aymara language and culture, will be visiting LCRC in August-September 2014, working on knowledge systems of the Andean peoples.

LCRC members news

Hannah Sarvasy, a PhD candidate at LCRC, has commenced her lectureship at the Department of Linguistics at UCLA. Her PhD, a comprehensive grammar of Nungon, will be submitted to examiners shortly.

Special events (within the framework of JCU's Celebrating Research program)

Special Seminar

Wednesday 23 July
Dr Felix Ameka, Leiden University – 'Meteorological expressions in West African languages: a typological perspective'

Special workshop

Nominalizations in the Americas (and beyond)
6–7 August 2014

  • Official opening by Professor Stewart Lockie, Director of The Cairns Institute, and book launch:
    The Grammar of Knowledge, edited by A. Y. Aikhenvald and R. M. W. Dixon. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014.
    Díʔzte, el zapoteco de San Agustín Loxicha, Oaxaca, México, by Mikko Benjamin Salminen. Munich: Lincom Europa (Languages of the World/Materials 498), 2014.
  • Simon Overall ‘Setting the scene’: Introducing the Workshop
  • Alexandra Aikhenvald ‘How to copy your neighbour’s ways: A cross-generational perspective on nominalizations in Tariana’
  • Elena Mihas ‘Some aspects of nominalization in Asheninka Perene’
  • Simon Overall ‘From verb to noun and back again: Non-referential uses of nominalizations in Aguaruna (Jivaroan)’
  • Katarzyna Wojtylak ‘The sense of Murui nominalizations (Witotoan, Colombia)’
  • Ana Kondic ‘Nominalization in South Eastern Huastec (Mayan, Mexico)’
  • Martin Kohlberger ‘Nominalizations in Shiwiar’
  • Summary by Simon Overall; discussion; publication plans
    Discussants:    Dr Angeliki Alvanoudi, Dr Azeb Amha, Prof. Lourens de Vries, Dr Diana Forker, Ms Nick Piper

Seminars and Workshop presentations

  • Seminar, Wednesday 2 July: Valérie Guérin – 'A preliminary report on demonstrative verbs'
  • Global Workshop. Wednesday 9 July: Elena Mihas – 'Questions in Ashéninka Perene'
  • Global Workshop, Wednesday16 July: Nick Piper – 'Questions in Meriam Mir'
  • Seminar, Wednesday 30 July: René van den Berg – 'Compounds or serial verbs? The case of Vitu'
  • Seminar, Wednesday 13 August: Lourens De Vries – 'The linguistic history of New Guinea's southern plains: approaches, problems, and a migration scenario'
  • Seminar, Wednesday 20 August: Rosita Henry – 'Tropical places, global issues: why anthropology matters'
  • Informal Discussion, Friday 22 August: Angeliki Alvanoudi – 'Interaction and grammar: the Conversation Analysis approach'
  • Seminar, Wednesday 27 August: René van den Berg – 'Compounds or serial verbs? The case of Vitu'
  • Global Workshop, Wednesday 3 September:Alexandra Aikhenvald – 'Questions in Tariana'
  • Seminar, Wednesday 10 September: Martin Kohlberger – 'Sound Change in Shiwiar: The Role of Production and Perception'

A Special Seminar series on Fieldwork organized by Dr Diana Forker (Feodor Lynen Research Fellow) has featured presentations on fieldwork in various parts of the world, by Katarzyna I. Wojtylak (Witoto Murui, Colombia), Juliane Böttger (Lele, Manus Province, PNG), Ana Kondic (Huastec, Mexico), Grant Aiton (Eibela, Western Province, PNG), Simon Overall (Aguaruna and Candoshi, Peru) and Diana Forker (Sandzhi Dargwa and Hinuq, Daghestan, Russia).

New books accepted for publication

  • Aikhenvald, Alexandra Y. and R. M. W. Dixon. Forthcoming. The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Typology. Cambidge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Alvanoudi, Angeliki. Forthcoming. Grammatical Gender In Interaction: Cultural And Cognitive Aspects. Leiden: Brill.
  • Mihas, Elena. Forthcoming. A grammar of Ashéninca Perené. Mouton Grammar Library. Berlin: De Gruyter.
  • Sarvasy, Hannah. Forthcoming. 2014. (ed). Non-spatial setting in Finisterre-Huon languages. Special Issue of Language Typology and Universals (STUF).

Further details are at https://research.jcu.edu.au/research/lcrc/News-and-Events/news.

Alexandra (Sasha) Aikhenvald

News from Macquarie University

For news of what's been happening in linguistics at Macquarie Uni, see our Linguistics news & events page.

Verna Rieschild

News from the Australian National University

News from Linguistics have been compiled in our newsletter available online: http://chl.anu.edu.au/departments/linguistics/news.php.

The Newsletter for August 2014 includes:

  • Piers Kelly as recipient of the Wurm Prize;
  • Darja Hoenigman as recipient of an ELDP postdoc position;
  • Wayan Arka's publications 'Locatives and the argument-adjunct distinction in Balinese';
  • The publication of 'The Routledge Handbook of Historical Linguistics' co-edited by Beth Evans and Claire Bowern, with chapters by Simon Greenhill, Harold Koch, Paul Sidwell, and Jane Simpson;
  • Attendance by staff and students to the South Asian Linguistics Society meeting, and Hymalayan Language Symposium, and the International Symposium on Chinese Languages and Linguistics.

We hope you will enjoy reading our newsletter. Previous editions are also available via our department's website.

Eri Kashima

Books/Theses

Proceedings: Australian Linguistic Society 2013

The Australian Linguistics Society (ALS) Conference 2013 Committee is pleased to announce that Selected Papers from the 44th Conference of the Australian Linguistic Society, 2013 is now published online in the University of Melbourne’s online repository Minerva Access:

http://bit.ly/ALS2013Proceedings

The volume contains 21 papers, all of which have been double blind peer-reviewed. Papers can be accessed individually from the following links:

Many thanks to the authors, reviewers and The University of Melbourne repository team.

Lauren Gawne and Jill Vaughan
Editors

Jill Vaughan

New Books Received August 2014

The following is a list of publications relating to the study of language, received by the Reviews Editor of the Australian Journal of Linguistics. Note that it is not possible to return books to the publisher, and that acceptance of a book implies no promise that it will be reviewed in the Australian Journal of Linguistics. Reviews are printed as circumstances permit, and copies are sent to the publishers of the works reviewed. If you wish to review a book, please contact the Reviews Editor, Alan Libert (Alan.Libert-at-newcastle.edu.au). Note that many books from previous lists of publications received are still available, so you may want to look at them also. If there is a book you are interested in reviewing but it is not on the list, please contact Alan as it is possible that ALS could then obtain a review copy from the publisher.

  • Bhatia, V. (2014) Worlds of Written Discourse: A Genre-Based View. Bloomsbury, London.
  • Block, D. (2014) Second Language Identities. Bloomsbury, London.
  • Cant, J. P. N. (2013) Science and Linguistic Theory. Faculty of Letters, Arts and Humanities, University of La Manouba, Tunis.
  • Collins, C. and P. M. Postal (2014) Classical NEG Raising. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Harris, R. and C. Hutton (2014) Definition in Theory and Practice: Language, Lexicography and the Law. Bloomsbury, London.
  • Jeffries, L. (2014) Opposition in Discourse: The Construction of Oppositional Meaning. Bloomsbury, London.
  • Kress, G., C. Jewett, J. Ogborn, and C. Tsatsarelis (2014) Multimodal Teaching and Learning: The Rhetorics of the Science Classroom. Bloomsbury, London.
  • Moore, T. J. (2013) Critical Thinking and Language: The Challenge of Generic Skills and Disciplinary Discourse. Bloomsbury, London.
  • Ndhlovu, F. (2014) Becoming an African Diaspora in Australia: Language, Culture, Identity. Palgrave McMillan, Basingstoke, Hampshire.
  • Rafferty, E., E. Barnhard, and L. Suharni (2014) Let's Speak Indonesian. Volume 1. University of Hawai'i Press, Honolulu.
  • Rafferty, E., M. Burns, and S. Argazali-Thomas (2014) Indonesian Grammar in Context. Volume 1. University of Hawai'i Press, Honolulu.
Alan Libert

Music Endangerment – How Language Maintenance Can Help

By Catherine Grant

JUNE 2014
Paperback  |  224 pp.
$27.95
978-0-19-979177-4

Oxford University Press is thrilled to announce the publication of Catherine Grant’s Music Endangerment: How Language Maintenance Can Help.

In response to increased focus on the protection of intangible cultural heritage across the world, this book offers a new practical approach to assessing, advocating for, and assisting the sustainability of musical genres. Drawing upon relevant ethnomusicological research on globalization and musical diversity, musical change, music revivals, and ecological models for sustainability, Grant systematically critiques strategies that are currently employed to support endangered musics. She then constructs a comparative framework between language and music, adapting and applying the measures of language endangerment as developed by UNESCO, in order to identify ways in which language maintenance might (and might not) illuminate new pathways to keeping these musics strong.

For more information or to order, please see Oxford University Press at http://www.oup.com.au/titles/academic/music/9780199352180.

Catherine Grant

The Languages and Linguistics of Australia: A Comprehensive Guide

Just published!

Koch, Harold and Rachel Nordlinger (eds). 2014. The Languages and Linguistics of Australia: A Comprehensive Guide (The World of Linguistics, Volume 3). Berlin: de Gruyter Mouton. [ISBN 978-3-11-027969-6, e-ISBN 978-3-11-027977-1].

See http://www.degruyter.com/view/serial/41883.

Includes contributions by:
Brett Baker, Claire Bowern, Andrew Butcher, Peter Collins, Diana Eades, Janet Fletcher, Alice Gaby, Harold Koch, Felicity Meakins, Rachel Nordlinger, Ruth Singer, Michael Walsh.

Harold Koch

New grammar: Worrorra – a language of the north-west Kimberley coast

A newly-published grammar of the Australian language Worrorra is now available:

'Worrorra: a language of the north-west Kimberley coast'
Mark Clendon, University of Adelaide Press, 2014

Information about this publication may be seen at:

http://www.adelaide.edu.au/press/titles/worrorra/.

Mark Clendon

Upcoming Conferences

Call for expression of interest: Workshop at ALW 2015

Revitalising ancestral Song traditions in south-eastern Australia

Call for expression of interest in a proposed workshop at ALW March 2015

In south-eastern Australia the revitalisation of ancestral Song traditions faces problems of both a technical and a social nature. Jim Wafer (U. Newcastle) is proposing a workshop to address some of the issues, at the next Aboriginal Languages Workshop (held at Kioloa, on the south coast of NSW), 6-8 March 2015. If you would be interested in taking part as either one of the presenters or as a participant, please email James.Wafer-at-newcastle.edu.au before 30 November.

Jane Simpson, James Wafer

Call for papers: Australasian Language Technology Workshop (ALTA 2014)

RMIT Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
http://www.alta.asn.au/events/alta2014/

Submission deadline: 19 September 2014
Tutorials: 26 November 2014
Workshop: 27–28 November 2014

This year the Australasian Language Technology Workshop (ALTA) will be held at the RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, on Wednesday 26 Friday - 28 November. This event will be the twelfth annual instalment of the ALTA Workshop in its current incarnation, and the continuation of an annual workshop series that has existed under various guises since the early 90s.

The goals of the ALTA workshop are:

  • to bring together the growing Language Technology (LT) community in the Australasian region and encourage interactions;
  • to encourage interactions and collaboration within this community and with the wider international LT community;
  • to foster interaction between academic and industrial researchers, to encourage dissemination of research results;
  • to provide a forum for students and young researchers to present their research;
  • to facilitate the discussion of new and ongoing research and projects;
  • to provide an opportunity for the broader artificial intelligence community to become aware of local LT research; and, finally,
  • to increase visibility of LT research in Australasia and overseas.

Topics

We invite the submission of papers on original and unpublished research on all aspects of natural language processing, including, but not limited to:

  • phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and discourse;
  • speech understanding and generation;
  • interpreting spoken and written language;
  • natural language generation;
  • linguistic, mathematical, and psychological models of language;
  • NLP-based information extraction and retrieval;
  • corpus-based and statistical language modelling;
  • machine translation and translation aids;
  • question answering and information extraction;
  • natural language interfaces and dialogue systems;
  • natural language and multimodal systems;
  • message and narrative understanding systems;
  • evaluations of language systems;
  • embodied conversational agents;
  • computational lexicography;
  • summarisation;
  • language resources;
  • topic modelling and unsupervised language analysis;
  • social media analysis and processing;
  • domain-specific adaptation of natural language processing algorithms.

Invited Speakers

We are working to line up exciting speakers for the event. We will announce them when they are confirmed.

Tutorials

We would like to offer a few full- or half-day tutorials on Wednesday 26th of November and are currently requesting proposals for tutorial topics.

If you would like to present a tutorial, or can suggest a topic of interest and a potentially interested individual or group to present it, please contact the organisers as soon as possible (workshop-at-alta.asn.au).

For more information, please see http://www.alta.asn.au/events/alta2014/alta-2014-tutorials.html.

Submissions

We welcome submissions on any topic that is of interest to the LT community, and particularly encourage submissions that broaden the scope of our community through the consideration of practical LT applications and through multi-disciplinary research. We also especially encourage submissions from industry.

Submissions will be through EasyChair: https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=altw2014

All submissions should follow the ACL 2014 style guidelines and must be in PDF format.

Full paper submissions may consist of up to eight (8) pages of content plus any number of pages consisting of only references. Short papers may consist of up to four (4) pages of content plus any number of pages consisting of only references. All submissions should follow the two-column format of ACL proceedings. Full papers will be distinguished from short papers in the proceedings.

Papers will be presented either orally or as posters at the workshop. There will be no distinction between papers presented orally and those presented as posters in the proceedings.

Reviewing of papers will be double-blind. Therefore, the paper must not include the authors' names and affiliations. Furthermore, self-references that reveal the author's identity, e.g., "We previously showed (Smith, 1991) ...", must be avoided. Instead, use citations such as "Smith (1991) previously showed ...". Papers not conforming to these requirements will be rejected without review.

We strongly recommend the use of the ACL LaTeX style files or Microsoft Word Style files tailored for this year's conference. The style files and example documents will be available from the workshop website. We reserve the right to reject submissions that do not conform to these styles including font and page size restrictions.

Proceedings

The full proceedings volume will have an ISSN and will be published online on the ACL anthology website as well as the website of the Australasian Language Technology Association (ALTA).

Student Travel Support

With the generous support of our sponsors, ALTA will be offering travel support for students to attend and present at ALTA 2014. We will provide details of this on the workshop website at a later date.

Important Dates

Please note that as ALTA 2014 happens earlier in the year than in previous years, there will be *no* extensions to the submission deadline, given this tight schedule.

Submission deadline: 19 September (23:59 GMT +10:00)
Notification: 24 October
Final camera-ready copy: 7 November
ALTA Workshop: 26-28 November

Committee

Workshop co-chairs:
    Gabriela Ferraro (NICTA)
    Stephen Wan (CSIRO)

Local Organisers:
    Lawrence Cavedon (RMIT)

We are pleased to be working with Falk Scholer (RMIT) to organise the co-located event: the Australian Document Computing Symposium.

Program Committee:
    François Lareau (Université de Montréal)
    Wray Lindsay (Monash University)
    Andrea Schalley (Griffith University)
    Scott Nowson (Xerox Research Centre Europe)
    Anthony Nguyen (The Australian e-Health Research Centre)
    Will Radford (Xerox Research Centre Europe)
    Rolf Schwitter (Macquarie University)
    Su Nam Kim  (Monash University)
    Timothy Baldwin (University of Melbourne)
    Lawrence Cavedon (RMIT University)
    Nathalie Colineau (DSTO)  
    Dominique Estival (University of Western Sydney)
    Graeme Hirst (University of Toronto)
    David Martinez (University of Melbourne)
    Diego Molla  (Macquarie University)
    Cecile Paris (CSIRO)
    Horacio Saggion (Universitat Pompeu Fabra)
    Karin Verspoor (The University of Melbourne)
    Sarvnaz Karimi (CSIRO)
    Alistair Knott (University of Otago)
    Ben Hachey  (University of Sydney)
    Lan Du  (Macquarie University)
    Joel Nothman (University of Sydney)
    Tara Mcinkintosh (Google)
    David Powers (Flinders University)
    Ingrid Zuckerman (Monash University)
    Meladel Mistica (Intel Corporation)
    Lizhen Qu  (NICTA)
    Gholamreza Haffari (Monash University)
    Alicia Burga (University Pompeu Fabra)
    Trevor Cohn  (Melbourne University)

Sponsorship

We are pleased to announce that we have already secured sponsorship for the workshop from the CSIRO.

If you or your organisation are interested in sponsoring the ALTA workshop, please contact the workshop organisers for information.

Enquiries

The Australasian Language Technology Workshop is being organised by ALTA, the Australasian Language Technology Association. For any comments or questions about the workshop please contact the workshop organisers (workshop-at-alta.asn.au).

ALTA Membership

We invite anyone interested in language technology research and development in Australia and New Zealand to join ALTA by subscribing to the ALTA mailing list. You will then receive periodic announcements by the ALTA Executive Committee about forthcoming activities and resources of the Association. For more information and to sign up, please see http://www.alta.asn.au/mailing_lists/index.html or simply send an email to alta-announce+subscribe-at-googlegroups.com.

Stephen Wan

Society for the History of Linguistics in the Pacific (SHLP4)

The fourth biennial conference of the Society for the History of Linguistics in the Pacific (SHLP4) will take place in Alice Springs, Australia, 22-23 September 2014.

David Moore

Jobs, grants, and scholarships

PhD Opportunities: The ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, University of Melbourne node

Applications are now being sought for PhD positions in the Shape of Language program of the new Centre for Excellence for the Dynamics of Language (CoEDL), funded by the Australian Research Council for the period mid-2014 to mid-2021. CoEDL (http://www.dynamicsoflanguage.edu.au/) is launching an ambitious series of interlinked projects, focusing on language as a dynamic and variable system, and drawing on the full diversity of the world’s languages, through four programs focusing on the design space of language (Shape), how it is learned (Learning) and processed (Processing), and how linguistic structures evolve at various timescales (Evolution). Two ‘threads’ (Archiving, and New Generation technologies) will enable the technological advances needed to drive forward the language sciences in the coming decades. The Centre is strongly interdisciplinary and features researchers from linguistics, speech pathology, psychology, anthropology, philosophy, bioinformatics and robotics. CoEDL is centred on four Australian Universities (Australian National University, University of Melbourne, University of Western Sydney and University of Queensland), with partner institutions in Australasia and the Pacific, Asia, Europe and North America.

The present PhD positions will be located at the University of Melbourne, and situated within the Shape program (led by Rachel Nordlinger). Potential topics include the following:

  • Description and documentation of a traditional indigenous language of Australia (possibilities include, but are not limited to Kunbarlang, Ritharrngu, Yolngu Matha languages, languages of the Daly River region, languages of the Western Desert region).
  • Description and documentation of new Australian varieties, including Kriol.
  • Multigenerational documentation of an Australian language (e.g. Murrinh-Patha, Arrernte, Yolngu), which focuses not so much on a static description of the traditional language, but aspects of language use across generations, preferably as part of a team of researchers all working within the same language community.
  • Description and documentation of undescribed languages of Vanuatu.

Other topics that tie in with the Shape of Language research program are also possible, through negotiation with Assoc. Prof. Rachel Nordlinger.

Each PhD position will undertake substantial fieldwork in the relevant speech community. PhD applicants will need to successfully apply for an Australian Postgraduate Award (or other suitable scholarship), but will receive generous fieldwork funding, conference travel funds, and substantial training and development opportunities within the newly ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language (http://dynamicsoflanguage.edu.au/). PhD students will be supervised by Assoc. Prof. Rachel Nordlinger and/or Dr. Nick Thieberger and work closely with the team of researchers associated with the Research Unit of Indigenous language at the University of Melbourne (http://indiglang.arts.unimelb.edu.au/), as well as researchers across the other CoEDL nodes (ANU, UWS, UQ).

Interested applicants should contact Rachel Nordlinger (racheln-at-unimelb.edu.au) for further details, and provide the following:

  • CV with educational qualifications, any publications and other relevant experience (e.g. fieldwork, relevant internships);
  • Transcript of prior undergraduate and/or postgraduate degrees (must have at least 80% average to be competitive);
  • A two-page statement setting out your preferred topic, potential field site, what skills and personal attributes you will bring to the project, and what you see as the most interesting and challenging issues you will address;
  • If available, other materials supporting your case (e.g. relevant articles or other materials).

Deadline: 15th September 2014

Approved applicants will then make a formal application for enrolment and scholarship through the regular University of Melbourne system, by the end of October 2014.

General information about the doctoral program in the School of Languages and Linguistics at the University of Melbourne is available at: https://handbook.unimelb.edu.au/view/current/101AA.

Rachel Nordlinger

PhD/MPhil Opportunities: The ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, University of Queensland node

Applications are now being sought for PhD/MPhil positions in the Shape of Language program of the new Centre for Excellence for the Dynamics of Language (CoEDL), funded by the Australian Research Council for the period mid-2014 to mid-2021. CoEDL [http://www.dynamicsoflanguage.edu.au/] is launching an ambitious series of interlinked projects, focusing on language as a dynamic and variable system, and drawing on the full diversity of the world’s languages, through four programs focusing on the design space of language (Shape), how it is learned (Learning) and processed (Processing), and how linguistic structures evolve at various timescales (Evolution). Two ‘threads’ (Archiving, and New Generation technologies) will enable the technological advances needed to drive forward the language sciences in the coming decades. The Centre is strongly interdisciplinary and features researchers from linguistics, speech pathology, psychology, anthropology, philosophy, bioinformatics and robotics. CoEDL is centred on four Australian Universities (Australian National University, University of Melbourne, University of Western Sydney and University of Queensland), with partner institutions in Australasia and the Pacific, Asia, Europe and North America.

The present PhD/MPhil positions will be located at the University of Queensland, and situated within the Shape program. Potential topics include the following:

  • Morpho-syntactic dialectal survey of Kriol
  • Morpho-syntax of language change or contact in a well described Australian language e.g. an Arandic language
  • Alternate registers in Central Australian languages e.g. mother-in-law speech
  • Topics in morpho-syntax/semantics/information structure of an Gurindji, Kaytetye or related languages
  • Topics in or a grammar of a newly emerged language e.g. Kriol, mixed language
  • Grammar of a previously undescribed Australian language
  • Topic suggested by applicant

Each PhD/MPhil position will undertake substantial fieldwork in the relevant speech community or extensive work on an existing body of material of an Arandic or Ngumpin-Yapa language. PhD/MPhil applicants will need to successfully apply for an Australian Postgraduate Award (or other suitable scholarship e.g. UQ Research Scholarship), but will receive generous fieldwork funding, conference travel funds, and substantial training and development opportunities within the newly ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language (http://dynamicsoflanguage.edu.au/).

PhD/MPhil students will be supervised by Felicity Meakins and/or Myfany Turpin and/or another suitable member of the School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies, as well as researchers across the other CoEDL nodes (ANU, UWS, UQ).

Interested applicants should contact Felicity Meakins (f.meakins-at-uq.edu.au) or Myfany Turpin (m.turpin-at-uq.edu.au) for further details, and provide the following:

  1. CV with educational qualifications, any publications and other relevant experience (e.g. fieldwork, relevant internships)
  2. Transcript of prior undergraduate and/or postgraduate degrees (must have at least 80% average to be competitive)
  3. Two-page statement setting out your preferred topic, potential field site, what skills and personal attributes you will bring to the project, and what you see as the most interesting and challenging issues you will address
  4. If available, other materials supporting your case (e.g. relevant articles or other materials)

Deadline: 15th September 2014

Approved applicants will then make a formal application for enrolment and scholarship through the regular University of Queensland system, by 17 October 2014: http://www.uq.edu.au/grad-school/scholarships-and-fees.

Felicity Meakins

PhD Opportunities: The ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, ANU node

Expressions of interest are now being sought for PhD positions at the new Centre for Excellence for the Dynamics of Language (CoEDL), funded by the Australian Research Council for the period mid-2014 to mid-2021. This is the first stage in a two-step procedure: in this first stage we will go through the overall field of applications, and rank them for fit and competitiveness, then in a second phase we will get back to the highly-ranked ones with guidance about how to go through the somewhat baroque process of making a formal application.

CoEDL [http://www.dynamicsoflanguage.edu.au/] is launching an ambitious series of interlinked projects, focusing on language as a dynamic and variable system, and drawing on the full diversity of the world’s languages, through four programs focusing on the design space of language (Shape), how it is learned (Learning) and processed (Processing), and how linguistic structures evolve at various timescales (Evolution). Two ‘threads’ (Archiving, and New Generation technologies) will enable the technological advances needed to drive forward the language sciences in the coming decades. The Centre is strongly interdisciplinary and features researchers from linguistics, speech pathology, psychology, anthropology, philosophy, bioinformatics and robotics. CoEDL is centred on four Australian Universities (Australian National University, University of Melbourne, University of Western Sydney and University of Queensland), with partner institutions in Australasia and the Pacific, Asia, Europe and North America.

The present PhD positions will be located at the Australian National University (ANU), which houses researchers working in and across all four Programs, and we are particularly interested in doctoral students whose interests make new interconnections between various approaches to language. Potential topics include the following:

  • Description and documentation of a traditional indigenous language of Australia;
  • Description and documentation of new Australian varieties, including Kriol, new mixed languages;
  • Multigenerational documentation of an Australian language focusing on aspects of language-use across generations;
  • Description and documentation of an undescribed Papuan language;
  • Corpus-based study of an Australian or Papuan language; or corpus-based study of the coding of social-cognition across a parallel corpus;
  • Quantitative sociolinguistic study of immigrant varieties of Australian English;
  • Experimental studies of first language acquisition and language processing;
  • Corpus- and/or fieldwork-based study of language acquisition with particular focus on intersubjective functions,  preferably in  a language of the Asia-Pacific region;
  • Language phylogenies and human prehistory in New Guinea or South-East Asia;
  • Linking language micro-evolution to language macroevolution;
  • Coevolutionary interactions between language, cognition or culture;
  • Evolution and co-evolution of language structures.

PhD applicants will need to successfully apply for an Australian Postgraduate Award (or other suitable scholarship); CoEDL will then supplement this with generous conference travel funds, and substantial training and development opportunities. Field-based PhD positions will undertake substantial fieldwork in the relevant speech community, and generous fieldwork support and mentoring will be provided.

PhD students will be supervised by CoEDL researchers, as well as researchers across the other CoEDL nodes (Universities of Melbourne, Queensland and Western Sydney).

Interested applicants should contact coedl-at-anu.edu.au in the first instance; COEDL will then prioritise the most competitive applications and contact approved applicants about making a formal application for enrolment and scholarship through the regular ANU system, by 31st August 2014 for international applicants and by the 31st October 2014 for applicants from Australia and New Zealand.

In their applications, applicants should provide the following:

  1. CV with educational qualifications, any publications and other relevant experience (e.g. fieldwork, relevant internships);
  2. Transcript of prior undergraduate and/or postgraduate degrees (will normally need at least 80% average to be competitive);
  3. A two-page statement setting out your preferred topic, potential field site (if relevant), what skills and personal attributes you will bring to the project, and what you see as the most interesting and challenging issues you will address;
  4. If available, other materials supporting your case (e.g. relevant articles or other materials);
  5. For applicants whose undergraduate/postgraduate theses are not in English, their most recent TOEFL/IELTS scores.

Deadline for initial expressions of interest (International applicants): 20 August 2014 (note formal application must be completed by 31 August).

Deadline (Australian and New Zealand Applicants): 15th September 2014.

Scholarship information is available at: http://students.anu.edu.au/scholarships/gr/off/

General information about applying is available here: http://students.anu.edu.au/applications/gradresearch.php

Nick Evans

Opportunity for 3-year PhD scholarship in Tangsa languages linguistic project at La Trobe University

Summary

A three-year PhD scholarship is now available through the Centre for Research on Language Diversity at La Trobe University in connection with the Australian Research Council-funded Future Fellowship project, ‘A multifaceted study of Tangsa – a network of linguistic varieties in North East India’.

This project has been underway since 2011, under the direction of Chief Investigator and ARC Future Fellow, Dr Stephen Morey. It investigates the complex linguistic diversity of the Tangsa languages, spoken on the India-Burma border, and documents the traditional knowledge of those communities with a particular emphasis on ritual texts and traditional songs. The recordings are being archived for public access at the DoBeS archive and on-line dictionaries are being produced for as many varieties as possible.

The PhD student for this project would be working on the documentation and description of one of the previously undescribed varieties of Tangsa, perhaps the Moklum variety, spoken in the Changlang district of Arunachal Pradesh.

The successful scholarship applicant will:

  • Hold a recent undergraduate degree and/or masters-level qualification, preferably in the discipline of linguistics;
  • Present a research proposal complementary to the project.

To apply, please submit a curriculum vitae and 300-word research proposal to language.diversity-at-latrobe.edu.au by the advertised closing date.  

The successful applicant will also be required to fulfil the University’s requirements for making an application for research candidature. More information can be found at: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/research/future/apply

Eligibility

This opportunity is open to citizens of all countries, including Australia and New Zealand. Applicants must have completed at least 4 years of tertiary education studies at a very high level of achievement (i.e. first class honours degree or equivalent) at an Australian university or recognized overseas university.

The successful candidate will be required to commence study between 1 January and 31 March 2015.

Note: applicants who have previously held an APA or LTUPRS for more than 3 months are not eligible to apply.

Scholarship amount

$25,392 per annum full-time (tax exempt); $12,696 per annum part-time (taxable).

Tuition fees

Australian and New Zealand citizens enrolled in a Higher Degree by Research will not pay tuition fees. International applicants may be eligible for tuition fee scholarships in addition to this living allowance scholarship.

Allowances

Relocation and travel allowances will be available to the successful recipient, from interstate or international location to Melbourne.

  • Relocation allowance (to Melbourne from another city):
    Removal expenses of up to $540 per adult and $280 per child to a maximum of $1,550;
  • Travel expenses (economy airfares maximum) for student, spouse and dependants.
    Scholarship holders who apply from outside Australia will be reimbursed the equivalent economy airfare from Perth to Melbourne. (Receipts and tickets must be produced with claim.)
    Note: The relocation allowance is payable only for removal and travel expenses to Melbourne.
  • Thesis expenses allowance of up to $850 (eg. copy-editing).

Closing date: 5:00pm, Friday 12 September 2014.

Enquiries

For more information about this scholarship, please contact the Director of the Centre for Research on Language Diversity, Associate Professor Adam Schembri, on a.schembri-at-latrobe.edu.au or +61 3 9479 2887. For more information on the related project, please contact Dr Stephen Morey, s.morey-at-latrobe.edu.au or +61 3 9479 6413.

La Trobe University’s success is driven by people who are committed to making a difference. They are creative and highly motivated, pursue new ideas and create knowledge. La Trobe is among the top 100 universities in the world under the age of 50 (Times Higher Education Rankings 2013), one of Australia’s research leaders, and the largest provider of higher education to regional Victoria. Our teaching and research address some of the most significant issues of our time and we’re passionate about driving change to benefit the communities we serve.

UQ Summer Research Scholarships

The University of Queensland is again seeking good advanced undergraduate and Honours students in Linguistics for the Summer Research Program in the following project:

Agents of Change: Gurindji Children and the Evolution of Gurindji Kriol
http://www.slccs.uq.edu.au/PDF/UQ%20Summer%20Winter%20Research%20Projects/MEAKINS_SummerResearch_2014.pdf

This project will form a part of Felicity Meakins' ARC project examining changes in Gurindji Kriol across two generations of Gurindji people. It will compare the speech of 10 year old Gurindji children with the linguistic input they received as babies.

Summer Research scholars will be trained in linguistic annotation and will code transcribed recordings in preparation for statistical analysis.

Summer Research scholars will gain hands on experience in using CLAN and will become familiar with linguistic annotation tools and elicitation methodologies, and its application to youth Indigenous varieties in Australia.

The project will run full-time for 10 weeks from 17 November 2014 to 6 February 2015 with a two week break over Christmas and New Year (20 Dec - 4 Jan). Summer Research scholars will be paid $300/wk with an additional $500 towards travel costs for non–UQ domestic students or $1000 for international students.

This project is open to applications from advanced students with a background in Linguistics and an interest in fieldwork, Australian languages and language contact.

For more information: http://www.slccs.uq.edu.au/index.html?page=178428&pid=19244

Or contact Felicity directly: f.meakins-at-uq.edu.au

Please apply through: http://www.uq.edu.au/uqadvantage/submit-application

Felicity Meakins

About ALS

The Australian Linguistic Society is the national organization for linguists and linguistics in Australia. Its primary goal is to further interest in and support for linguistics research and teaching in Australia. Further information about the Society is available by clicking here.

The ALS Newsletter is issued four times per year, in the middle of February, May, August and November. Information for the Newsletter should be sent to the Editor, Andrea Schalley (alsonline-at-als.asn.au) by the end of the first week of February, May, August, and November. There is a list of people who are automatically advised that it is time to contribute material; if you wish to be added to that list, send Andrea an email.

Subscriptions for ALS are due at the beginning of each calendar year; the year you are paid up to is shown on the address label on the envelope of your copy of the Australian Journal of Linguistics. Membership matters are handled on behalf of the Society by Taylor & Francis, the publishers of the Australian Journal of Linguistics. If you wish to join the Society or make an alteration to your existing membership details please contact the Customer Service at Taylor & Francis on +61 (0)3 8842-2413 or at enquiries-at-tandf.com.au.



by Dr. Radut